1891 Census Names Index
Guiltcross hundred
Guiltcross union
Kelly's 1883 Directory entry
White's 1845 and 1883 and Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Banham post-mill, (composite) windmill and Banham towermill [Jonathan Neville]
Banham archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Local web-site
More on Banham [GENUKI-NFK]
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Norfolk - Banham

Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, pp. 756-758

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, December 2001]

BANHAM, a parish and village, 2 miles from Kenninghall, and 5 miles E. by N. of East Harling, comprises 260 houses, 1,195 inhabitants, and 3,963 acres of rich land, with a loamy soil, belonging to the Duke of Norfolk and a number of copyholders and freeholders, many of whom are residents. The whole is in the Duke of Norfolk's manors of Banham Heath, Greys, Breckhall, Hockham, and Mareschalls. A fair for horses, &c., is held on the 22nd of June. About ¾ of a mile south of the village are extensive works for the manufacture of superior bricks, tiles, and chimney pots. The Rev. S. F. Surtees purchased, in the Exhibition, Whitehead's machine for making hollow bricks, the same as those used in building the "Model Cottages," exhibited by Prince Albert. They are made here under Roberts's patent, by Mr. Geo. Gilbert, and have a beautiful white and stone-like appearance. A handsome National school has recently been erected of these bricks, at the expense of the rector. The Church, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, has a square tower, surmounted by a wooden spire ; and in a side chapel lies the effigy of the founder, Sir Hugh Bardolph, Knight. The rectory, valued in the King's book at £9 3s. 6½d., and in 1831 at £800, has 34a. of glebe, and is in the patronage of the Crown, and incumbency of the Rev. S. F. Surtees. The Methodists and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel here. John Bedwell, in 1713, left £5 4s. yearly for educating six poor children. The Town Lands consist of about 43a., let for £65 a year, and a building, called the Pest House, occupied rent-free by poor people. Out of the rents £4 is divided among the poor ; 7s. 5d. paid for quid-rent ; and the residue is applied in the service of the church. The Fuel Allotment, awarded at the enclosure in 1790, consists of 123a. 2r. 2p. of fen, on which the poor cut turf, and let the herbage for about £55 a year ; and 9a. 3r. 27p. on Holme-hill, let for £16 a year, which is distributed among the poor in clothing on New Year's-day. The Guildhall Feoffeement consists of three tenements, occupied by poor people, and 3a. 33p. of land, let for £3 10s. These premises being settled for superstitious uses, fell to the lord of the manor, who, in 1549, granted them to feoffees, for the use of all the copyhold tenants, on condition that the lord should have liberty to hold the manor court in the Guildhall. The poor have 40s. yearly left by Mrs. Gawdy and Mrs. Bidwell. Mrs Bowles, in 1832, left 5a. 3r. 20p. of land, in trust for the poor of Banham and Kenninghall. Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, December 2001; links updated February 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
Guiltcross hundred
Guiltcross union
Kelly's 1883 Directory entry
White's 1845 and 1883 and Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Banham post-mill, (composite) windmill and Banham towermill [Jonathan Neville]
Banham archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Local web-site
More on Banham [GENUKI-NFK]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page