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Suffolk - Belton [now in Norfolk]

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 808.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

BELTON is a parish and village in a valley on the banks of the navigable Waveney, with a station on the East Suffolk railway, 4½ miles south-west from Yarmouth and 8 north-west from Lowestoft, in the Eastern division of the county, hundred and incorporation of Mutford and Lothingland, county court district of Great Yarmouth, rural deanery of Lothingland, archdeaconry of Suffolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of All Saints is an old building of flint with stone dressing in the Decorated style, with thatched roof, and has chancel, nave, south porch and round tower (rebuilt in 1849) containing 1 bell: it also has an organ: important works of restoration were effected in 1881 from the designs of Messrs. Bottle & Olley, architects, Great Yarmouth: the much deayed roof of the nave with its thatch covering has been replaced by a new open timbered roof of appropriate character covered with Broseley plain tiles: the old seating was replaced by new open benches in wainscot oak, and other minor works of restoration have also been caried out. The register dates from 1560, and the entries record that the plague raged here in the spring of 1665; this disease must have spread from Yarmouth, where, in the previous year, 2,500 persons fell vctims to its fury, amongst whom were the ministers of Yarmouth church. The living is a rectory, tithes commuted at £440 yearly, with residence and 17 acres of glebe, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1837 by the Rev. Thomas George Francis Howes M.A. of Oriel College, Oxford. R. H. Reeve esq. is lord of the manor. The principal landowners are Sir Savile B. Crossley bart. the Misses Larkman, Miss Barber and E. Stannard esq. The soil is a light land; subsoil, sand. The chief crops are barley, turnips, whrat and hay. The area is 2,059 acres, 674 of which, on the river side, are marsh land; rateable value, £3,723; the population in 1881 was 624.

BROWSTON is a hamlet 1 mile south-east. Browston Hall is an ancient brick building, with gardens, formerly the seat of the Symonds and Le Grice families, now occupied by Edward Stannard esq.


POST OFFICE. —Robert Morris, receiver. Letters through Yarmouth arive at 6.30 a.m.; dispatched at 5.40 p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Gorleston

National School, built in 1860, with good residence adjoining for the mistress; Miss Frances B. Hemming, mistress.

Railway Station, George Reeve, station master

Transcription © Copyright E C ("Paddy") Apling, December 2007, links updated September 2014.


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