1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
St Mary, Binham [Simon Knott]
Binham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Binham postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Binham towermill [Jonathan Neville]
Bingham and beyond (Introduction to the churches of Binham, Cockthorpe, Langham, Morston, and Stiffkey) [Simon Knott]
More on Binham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page

Norfolk - Binham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.247.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

BINHAM (or BIMHAM ABBEY) is a parish and large village 5 miles north-east from Walsingham station and 5 north-east-by-east from Wells, in the Northern division of the county, North Greenhoe hundred, Walsingham union, and county court district, rural deanery of Walsingham and archeaconry and diocese of Norwich. In the vale, through which runs the Stiffkey rivulet, are the ruins of the once famous Benedictine priory of St. Mary, founded in the latter half of the 13th century by Peter de Valoines, a nephew of William the Conqueror and finished in the reign of Henry I. by his son Roger de Valoines: ir was subject to St. Peter's of Clugni, in France, and affiliated as a cell to St. Albans for a prior and not less than eight monks: in the second year of King John the patronage was claimed by Robert Lord Fitzwalter, who besieged it in order to reinstate Thomas the prior, who had been deposed by the Prior of St. Albans, but the siege was successfully raised by the forces of King John sent for its defence: its dissolution occurred un the 31st year of King Henry VIII. soon after which it was granted to Thomas Paston esq. fifth son of Sir William Paston knight; it is now the property of Thomas Truesdale Clarke esq. of Swakeleys, near Uxbridge, Middlesex. The monastic church was formerly a stately cruciform edifice with a majestic tower: the nave appears to have always been, and still is, appropriated as the parish church: the eastern portion, which formed the conventual church, and the rest of the buildings, though very considerable, are gradually disappearing: the nave and transepts of the parish church, and part of south wall of the convebtual church, are splendid examples of Norman architecture; the west end of both churches, refectory, chapter-house and jail gate are Early English, the west front of the existing church being very fine: the east end of the conventual church, chapter-house and dormitories contain portons of the Decorated style, and in the north aisle of the conventual church precincts and other wals are traces of Perpendicular work: the present church comprises chancel and nave with clerestory and small bell cot with 1 bell; the font is on Perpendicular work, very old and mutilated, and divided into eight upper and eight lower panels, the upper containing carved representations of the Seven Sacraments of the Catholic Church and the Trinity, figures of saints in niches occupying its lower panels: there are also the remains of a very ancient and richly illuminated screen, with figures of saints. The register dates from the year 1559. The living is a vicarage, gross yearly value 160, tithe rent charge with glebe, in the gift of T.T. Clarke, esq. and held since 1855 by the Rev. Robert Corry Cavell. A Primitive Mehodist chapel was erected in 1868. There is a public house and 27A. 3R. 23P. of land, the annual rental from which is devoted to apprenticing the children if the poor, the distribution of coals and coats, and also in money to the widows; there are also two cottages for the occupation of deserving people, rent free. Henry I. gave this place a charter for a market and a fair; the former is obsolete but the latter is still held on the 26th of July. Part of the ancient market cross still remains. Thomas Truesdale Clarke esq. is lord of the manor and principal landowner; the tenure in the manor is by "smockhold," that is, the wife possesses an equal claim in the copyhold with her husband and retains her claim in the event of his dying intestate. The soil is light; subsoil, sand. The chief crops are wheat, barley and oats. The area is 2,242 acres; rateable value, 3,958; the population in 1881 was 478.

POST OFFICE.—Robert Harmer, receiver. Letters arrive through Wells at 9 a.m. & are forwarded to Wells by foot post at 2.50 p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at New Walsingham

National School. Mrs. Caroline Winfield, mistress

Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling, October 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
St Mary, Binham [Simon Knott]
Binham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Binham postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Binham towermill [Jonathan Neville]
Bingham and beyond (Introduction to the churches of Binham, Cockthorpe, Langham, Morston, and Stiffkey) [Simon Knott]
More on Binham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page