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Suffolk - Brandon

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 819-21

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

BRANDON is a market town, parish and station on the Great Eastern railway, 88½ miles from Londo6 west from Thetford and 9 north-east from Mildenhall, on the Little Ouse river (which here divides the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, and over which is a bridge of four arches), in the Western division of the county, partly in Norfolk, Lackford hundred, Thetford union and county court district, Fordham rural deanery, Sudbury archdeaconry and diocese of Ely. There is no local government, but the town is under the superintendence of the county police, who have a small station here. The church of St. Peter, situated a quarter of a mile west of the town, is an ancient structure, built of flint and stone, in the Early English style; it consists of chancel, nave, south aisle, with a Norman porch, containing a holy water stoup, and tower surmounted by a small spire, with 6 bells: the east end is ornamented with two cupolas: the church consisted originally of only a nave, built about 1050, and assumed its present dimensions about 1420: a new roof over the chancel was placed by the late rector in 1842; in 1873 a roof of higher pitch, was erected, and the church thoroughly restored, and seated with open benches at a cost of £2,100: the east window of five lights is stained, representing the Adoration of the Shepherds, the Baptism, the Lord's appearing to the Apostles on the Sea of Tiberias, the Crucifixion, and the Women at the tomb: at the west end there is another memorial window, of two lights, illustrative of Our Saviour washing St. Peter's feet, and the Baptism of Cornelius, placed by the family of the late George Wood esq.: during the restoration, some portions of a tesselated pavement were found; there is some carved seating, the lower portions of a rood screen of 1560. The register dates from the year 1653. The living is a rectory, with that of Wanford [sic = Wangford] annexed, joint yearly value tithe rent-charge of £707, with 147 acres of glebe and residence, in the gift of and held since 1865 by the Rev. William Foord Crocker M.A. of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. There are chapels for Baptists in the High street; Primitive Methodists in George street and Wesleyans in London road. Adjoining the church are three almshouses, rebuilt at the expense of the parish in 1840; they were devised by Mrs. Ann Curtis, in 1675; there are five other almshouses in the High street, appropriated to poor widows of this parish, which were rebuilt in 1877 in memory of Mrs. A. Angerstein, of Weeting Hall, by her daughter the late Mrs. C. A. Norman, widow of the late rector of Northwold. There are charities producing about £100 yearly. Thursday is the market day. The corn market is held at the Great Eastern Railway Hotel, adjoining the railway station. The fairs for cattle and toys are held February 14th and November 11th. There are some comfortable inns; and sub-branches of Gurneys and Co. Norwich Bank, and Oakes, Bevan and Co. of Bury, open every Thursday only. A considerable trade is carried on in malt and timber and in fur and skin dressing. Barges ply to and from Lynn with corn and coal. Gas works have been erected by a local company, and the town has, since the commencement of 1869, been lighted with gas. Gun-flints, and flints for building and ornamental purposes, are manufactured here: during the continental war, which terminated with the battle of Waterloo, and before percussion caps were introduced, the trade in gun-flints was the chief dependence of the working classes here; the description of flint obtained from the beds of Brandon, below the chalk stratum, is superior to any other, being more certain in its fire, and lasting longer than any other; the masses of flints from which the gun-flints are made are obtained from a common about a mile south-east of Brandon; the chalk is within 6 feet of the surface; the men sink a shaft 6 feet, and then proceed about 3 feet horizontally, and sink another shaft lower in the chalk, about 6 feet, and sometimes they fall in with a floor of rich flint at this depth; if not, they work again 3 feet horizontally, and sink another shaft 6 feet, and so they progress, perhaps, for 30 feet when generally they meet with three or four floors of flint, at every floor of which they excavate horizontally several yards: it is found in hue blocks, like septaria, which the men break into pieces sufficiently portable to hand from stage to stage, and a man being placed at each stage so formed, the flint is passed from hand to hand until it reaches the surface; it is then cut and worked with great skill into its required form. An extensive business is carried on in fur and rabbit skin dressing by Mr. William Rought, who employs over 200 hands in that business. A Workman's Hall was erected at the top of the High street in 1874, at a cost of £700. There are whiting mills; and an extensive steam saw mill, worked by Messrs. G. Wood and Sons, which give employment to many hands. A mile and a half south of the park is North Court Lodge, the estate of Henry Brook esq. prettily situated in a wood of fir trees. Brandon Park, the seat of Baron Henry de Barreto JP., K.G.C.S. is a handsome modern mansion, one mile from the town, situated in an extensive wood of fir trees. Half a mile west of the town is Brandon Hall, an ancient mansion, the seat of Robert Burton esq. Brandon House, the residence of the Rev. William Weller-Poley M.A., J.P. is a handsome brick building, situated on the Norfolk side of the river. There are also several villa residences. The Dukes of Suffolk took their names from this place, and it now gives the title of duke to the Hamilton family. Baron Henry de Barreto J.P. who is lord of the manor, and William Angerstein esq. J.P. are the principal landowners. The area is 6,759 acres, 25 in Norfolk; rateable value, £8,761; the population of the entire parish in 1881 was 2,309.

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POST, MONEY ORDER & TELEGRAPH OFFICE, Savings Bank & Government Insurance & Annuity office, High street.— Fuller Rolfe, postmaster. Letters from London arrive at 12.43 a.m. & 12.35 p.m.; dispatched to London at 11.30 a.m. & 10 p.m.; or with extra stamp until 10.45 p.m. Letters are delivered at 7 a.m. & 1 p.m. Money order & savings bank business transacted from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; saturdays till 8 p.m.: telegraph business from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

COUNTY MAGISTRATES FOR LOCKFORD PETTY SESSIONAL DIVISION
(sitting at Brandon).

Petty sessions are held at the Police station every fourth Thursday, commencing with the first in January & at the Police station, MIldenhall, every alternate Friday at 12.30

INSURANCE AGENTS.—County Fire, Williams & Wood, High street

PUBLIC ESTABLISHMENTS:—
PUBLIC OFFICERS:—
SCHOOLS:—
PLACES OF WORSHIP, with times of services:— Railway station, William Mann Simmons, station master

CARRIERS TO:—

[DIRECTORY:]—

© Transcribed by E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, August 2000; links updated September 2014.

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