1891 Census Names Index
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Norfolk - Brinton

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 257.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

BRINTON is a pleasant village and parish, 2 miles from Melton Constable station, 3½ west-south-west from Holt, 10 north-east from Fakenham and 13 west from Cromer, in the Northern division of the county, Holt hundred. Walsingham union and county court district. rural deanery of Holt, archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Andrew dates from Saxon times, when it was a small building with walls 7 feet high: in the Norman period this wall was heightened by about 3 feet, and a semicircular-headed doorway (now blocked), projecting into this newly added portion, can be faintly traced: in the Early English period the walls were again raised by 4 feet 3 inches, the building extended 21 feet westward, the junction being masked by the east wall of the present south porch, a north aisle and porch, now ruined, and transept were added, probably with a wooden arcading between the nave and them: a window and two buttresses of Early English design remain to attest date: from the faint indications of a beaten clay floor it is inferred that a circular tower was then added; but if so, it was replaced by a square one (which retains only one of its three bells) in the transition period from Decorated to Perpendicular (to which date the font is assigned); again the walls were elevated by 6 feet and the present stone arcading, running in height into this last extension of elevation, built between nave and transept, Perpendicular windows inserted, and a little Early English image of St. Andrew, cross in hand, placed over the transept window, where it still remains; a veil of plaster, built so as to resemble a vertical crack and slip of the masonry, having hidden it in troublous times: the then rector, John Skye, set going the restoration of the church soon after the Reformation, when the present simple but handsome roof and poppy-headed benches were added: a portion of the chancel was probably at this time reduced, the shortening being indicated (as at Binham and Bessingham) by a square-headed east window, which was retained, and the Story of the Epiphany added in glass by Meyer of Munich in 1873, when the church was generally cleaned of whitewash and deal pewing, and otherwise repaired, the cleansing laying bare sundry writings of Scripture on the walls, in obedience to the canons of 1604; the capacious water stoup, head of a Transition Norman pedestal piscina, till lately divided and used for quoining a buttress, and a carved oak chest, the gift of Mrs. Brereton, on leaving the parish, are worthy of notice, as also are the buttresses to transept of Gothic detail, which taper like a classical pillar, and therefore an interesting Transition feature. The village [preaching ?] cross, in these parts very frequently outside the churchyard, as at Binham, Field Dalling, Sharrington, Brinton and Edgefield, in almost living memory stood on the plain just west of the church, still the rendezvous of the village youth, who here meet for social intercourse; a portion of the shaft protects the angle of a building hardby. The register dates from the year 1547. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Thornage, joint yearly value £508, with about 56 acres of glebe in the two parishes, in the gift of Lord Hastings and held since 1863 by the Rev. Charles John Brereton B.A. of St. John's College, Cambridge, who resides at Thornage. The United Methodist Free Church have a place of worship here. £3 10s is distrubuted yearly from Rogers' charity. Lord Hastings, who is lord of the manor, A. E. Palmer esq. and the Rev. Shovell Brereton, are the principal landowners. The soil is light; subsoil, mixed. The chief crops are wheat and barley. The area is 625 acres; rateable value, £1.040; and the population in 1881 was 161.

Transcription © Copyright E C ("Paddy") Apling, October 2008; links updated November 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Brinton Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Brinton [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page