Return to villages index
Paddy's home page
1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
Mill Lane postmill and High Green postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Brooke Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Brooke [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]

Norfolk - Brooke

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 259.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

BROOKE is a parish and pleasant village 7 miles north from Flordon station, 7 south from Norwich and 7 north from Bungay, in the Southern division of the county, Clavering hundred, Loddon and Clavering union, Norwich county court district, rural deanery of West Brooke, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Peter is an old building of flint with stone dressings, in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave and north aisle, with round tower containing 6 bells, and south porch: it was thoroughly restored in 1859. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a vicarage; the vicarial tithes were commuted in 1642 for 240 yearly, with 4A. 1R. 16P. of glebe and residence, in the gift if the Lord Chancellor and held since 1873 by the Rev. Henry Murray Downton M.A. of Corpus Christi college, Cambridge. The Baptists hae a chapel, built in 1839. The town lands are 43A. 3R. in the parish, let for 51 and Pevers Farm, in Kirstead, 53A. 2R. let for 75 yearly, which sums are applied in lieu of church rates and in the maintenance of schools. The fuel allotment is 5 acres, let for 15 which is distributed in coals among the poor, who also have some small allowances left by J. Kerrison, J. Fowle and W. Brereton. In this parish were originated, in 1853, the Harvest Festivals, now universally adopted. Brooke Hall, the seat of George John Holmes esq. J.P. is a large mansion, in the Grecian style, standing near the site of the old hall, and was built in 1830 by its late owner: it is pleasantly situated in the midst of a beasutiful park, thickly studded with oak and other trees, and contains a fine piece of water. Brooke House, a plain square brick building, the seat of Viscount Canterbury, is in a large, well-wooded park. The Misses Knight have a handsome Elizabethan mansion here, called Brooke Lodge. George John Holmes esq. J.P. is lord of the manor and impropriator of the great tithes: this manor was given by William the Norman to the Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds, and the abbots obtained for it a market and fair, now disused. The principal landowners are Viscount Canterbury and George John Holmes esq. J,P. The soil is mixed: subsoil, gravel and clay. The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley. The area is 2,089 acres; rateable value, 3,398; the population in 1881 was 706.


POST & MONEY ORDER OFFICE & Savings Bank.—Richard F. Yallop, postmaster. Letters arrive from Norwich by mail cart at 5.30 a.m.' & dispatched at 5.15 p.m. Telegraph office at Loddon

Here is a Parochial school supported by funds from the town lands charity & managed by trustees in accordance with a scheme approved by the Court of Chancery, R. F. Yallop, clerk to the trustees; William Henry Emmett, master; Mrs. Francis Emily Emmett, mistress

CARRIERS:—

Transcription © Copyright E C ("Paddy") Apling, April 2010.

Return to villages index
Paddy's home page
1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
Mill Lane postmill and High Green postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Brooke Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Brooke [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]