1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Costessey watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Costessey postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Chapel of St Helen and Methodist church [Simon Knott]
Council web-site
Costessey Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Costessey [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
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Norfolk - Costessey

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp.278-9.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

COSTESSEY (corrupted into COSSEY) is a parish and village pleasantly situated on the river Wensum, 1 miles south-west from Drayton station on the Eastern and Midlands railway, and 4½ miles north-west from Norwich, and consists principally of one long street, extending nearly 2 miles, with houses of irregular form and size, in the Southern division of the county, Forehoe hundred and union, Norwich county court district, rural deanery of Hingham, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Edmund is a large building of flint, and consists of chancel and nave, with square tower and low wooden spire containing 5 bells: at the south entrance is an old Norman porch, and it contains a very handsome Florid Gothic screen: there are several monuments to the Waldegrave and Jerningham families. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £175, in the gift of the trustees of the Great Hospital at Norwich, and held since 1845 by the Rev. James Williams Evans, M.A. of Trinity College, Oxford. The Baptists have a chapel, situated in the centre of the village. The Wesleyans have a room in which divine service is performed every Sunday. There is a charity of £2. 2s. yearly value. At the eastern extremity of the village is a large flour mill, worked by the river Wensum. The Hall, the seat of Lord Stafford (who is lord of the manor and chief landowner), stands in an extensive park, close to the river Wensum. the new Hall, adjoining the old one, is of red brick, in the Tudor style, built by John Chester Buckler, of Oxford, with a tower and richly ornamented chimneys and pinnacles of the same material; it has a noble appearance, and is surrounded by plantations and over 900 acres of park with fine timber, and in which is a sheet of water: the mansion contains a choice collection of antiquities, and some fine paintings by old masters. The Catholic church of St. Walstan is a brick building, with narrow lancet windows, some of which are stained: attached is a residence for the priest. Here is a Catholic school, supported entirely by Lord Stafford. The soil is chiefly sand and light loam; subsoil various. The chief crops are wheat, oats, barley and turnips. The area is 2,770 acres, exclusive of a common of 270 acres, which has been enclosed; rateable value £4.475; and the population in 1881 was 960.

_____

POST & MONEY ORDER OFFICE & Savings Bank:—Caius Spaul, receiver. Letters arrive from Norwich at 5 a.m.; dispatched at 6.45 p.m. Norwich is the nearest telegraph office.

INSURANCE AGENT.Norwich Union Fire, H.Coverdale.

Collector of Assessed Taxes, John Pratt

Catholic School. the sisters of St. Paul are teachers

© Transcribed by E.C.Apling, January 1999; links updated May 2010.


1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Costessey watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Costessey postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Chapel of St Helen and Methodist church [Simon Knott]
Council web-site
Costessey Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Costessey [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page