1891 Census Names Index
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Ditchingham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Ditchingham tower mill and watermill [Jonathan Neville]
More on Ditchingham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
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Norfolk - Ditchingham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.298.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling; and see Note, below]

DITCHINGHAM is a parish and widely scattered village, and station on the Waveney Valley branch of the Great Eastern railway, next Bungay, Suffolk, to a part of which it adjoins, and is separated from it by the river Waveney, which is here crossed by an iron bridge, 13 miles south-east from Norwich, in the Southern division of the county, Loddon hundred, Loddon and Clavering union, Bungay and Beccles county court district, rural deanery of Brooke, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Mary stands on a height, and is of flint with stone dressings, in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave and north aisle, with square tower countering 6 very good bells : the east window is stained, in memory of Samuel Ives Sutton esq. and there is another memorial window on the south side to Col. George Wilson; the aisle and vestry were added to the church in 1873, and the chancel was thoroughly restored in 1880. The register dates from the year 1559. The living is a rectory, with 32 acres of glebe, and a tithe-rent charge of £556, in the gift of William Hartcup esq. and held, since 1881, by the Rev. John Charles Scudamore M.A. of St. John's College, Oxford : the living must be offered to a fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge. A cemetery of 1½ acres was formed in 1879: it is under the control of a burial board of nine members; there is a closed lych-gate, which is used as a mortuary chapel. Allhallows church, erected in 1865, as a chapel of ease, is a small building of flint, with stone dressings in the Early English style, and has a chancel, nave and bell-turret. The House of Mercy, opened in 1859, in conjunction with the Church Penitentiary Association, is under the care of the sisterhood of All Hallows, and has for its object the reception of women of unchaste lives, from all parts of England; the house is a large cruciform building with a beautiful chapel in the head of the cross; it can receive 30 penitents; warden, Rev. E. P. Williams; treasurer, Sister Catherine Rotch; Miss Lavinia Cross, lady superior. All Hallows Home, founded in 1867, is an orphanage for girls of the better classes who have fallen into reduced circumstances; they are admitted at any age above 3 and under 10, with the understanding that they remain in the Home until after confirmation; the house will hold 30 orphans; respectable girls of the lower classes are also received into the Home for industrial training as domestic servants. All Hallows Country Hospital is capable of holding 20 patients, who may be admitted without restriction from any practicable distance, at a small weekly payment; incurables, convalescents and lady patients are also received at an increased charge. These institutions are under the care of the same Sisters. The poor have certain allowances; and the rent of the town lands, which are let for about £100 yearly, is applied to the various public burdens of the parish. There is a charge of £2 a year on apiece of land, which is directed to e given to the poor in bread. Here is a large silk crape manufactory belonging to Messrs. Grant and Co. of Norwich and London, in which about 300 hands are employed. The Hall, a stately mansion, stands in a beautiful park, thickly studded with fine oak and other trees, and is the property of Philip Board Bedingfeld, esq. a minor, and at present occupied by Mrs. Morrice. The Lodge, Holy Hill and Ditchingham House are handsome residences. Tindall Hall, now converted into a farmhouse, belongs to Admiral Sir George N. Broke-Middleton bart. In this parish are the manors of Pirnhow and Ditchingham, of which the duke of Norfolk and the trustees of the Bedingfeld family are receptively lords. P. B. Bedingfield esq. Admiral Sir George N. Broke-Middleton and Henry Rider Haggard esq. are the principal landowners. The soil is light loam; subsoil, gravel. The chief crops are wheat, barley and turnips. The area is 2,077A. 0R. 32P.; the rateable value is £5,381; and the population in 1881 was 1,075.

________

POST OFFICE.—Frederick Bellamy, receiver. Letters through Bungay arrive at 8 a.m. & dispatched at 5 p.m. Bungay is the nearest money order & telegraph office

National School, Miss Matilda Bellamy, mistress

CARRIERS pass through from Bungay to Norwich

Note: Kelly's seem to have confused the All Hallows Chapel of Ease with the Chapel at Pirnhow. I have, accordingly, attached the All Hallows link to Simon Knott's page on the Pirnham Chapel, and his page on Allhallows to the Kelly description of the House of Mercy. I hope my links do not make the confusion worse confounded - but a reading of both links should make matters clear.
      ECA, June 2010.

© Transcribed by E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, November 2005; links updated January 2010; Note added June 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Ditchingham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Ditchingham tower mill and watermill [Jonathan Neville]
More on Ditchingham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Ditchingham watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page