1891 Census Names Index
Domesday Book (and Lewis's 1832, White's 1845 and Brabner 1895 all on same page) [Alan M. Stanier]
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
East Rudham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
East Rudham postmill and East Rudham (early) postmill [both Jonathan Neville]
More on East Rudham [GENUKI-NFK]
More parish information on East Rudham [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Directory information on Broomsthorpe [White's 1845; White's 1883 and Kelly's 1892 all GENUKI-NFK]
More on Broomsthorpe [GENUKI-NFK]
And see West Rudham
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Norfolk - East Rudham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 478.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

EAST RUDHAM is a parish and village on the Lynn road, with a station on the Eastern and Midlands railway, 7 miles west from Fakenham in the Western division of the county, Gallow hundred, Docking union, Little Walsingham county court district, rural deanery of Burnham, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Mary is a large building of flint, in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, lofty nave with clerestory, aisles, south porch and square embattled tower containing 3 bells, rebuilt in 1873. The register dates from the year 1565. The living is a vicarage, united with the vicarage of West Rudham, joint yearly value 560, with residence, in the gift of the Marquess of Townshend, who is lay impropriator, and held since 1867 by the Rev. Francis Garratt Wilson B.A. of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Here are two chapels, a Primitive Methodist and a Wesleyan. There is a fuel allotment of 20 acres, the rent of which is expended in coals and distributed to the poor at Christmas: there is also a charity of 5 for the poor left by a Lady Berkley about the year 1618. In 1868 Richard Dewing esq. of Carbrooke, devised 9 acres of land in trust to the vicar for the time being, the rent of which at present is 15 yearly, 5 of which is expended in fuel, and 10 onn the National school. Two fairs were held on May 17th and October 14th, but were abolished in 1876. The Marquess of Townshend, who is lord of the manor, and the Marquess of Chalmondeley, are the principal landowners. The soil is mixed; subsoil, principally chalk. The crops are generally on the four-course system. The area is 3,801 acres; rateable value, 4,626; the population in 1881 was 781.

BROOMESTHORPE is a decayed parish 1 mile east from East Rudham, containing one farm of 346 acres, in the occupation of Mr. William Francis; rateable value, 540 8s; the population in 1881 was 12. There are traces of an old church. The inhabitants attend Est Rudham church. John Stonehewer Scott Chad esq. is lord of the manor and chief landowner. The children attend the school at East Rudham.


© Transcribed by E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, February 2009; links updated November 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
Domesday Book (and Lewis's 1832, White's 1845 and Brabner 1895 all on same page) [Alan M. Stanier]
White's 1845 and 1883 [both GENUKI-NFK];
East Rudham postmill and East Rudham (early) postmill [both Jonathan Neville]
More on East Rudham [GENUKI-NFK]
More parish information on East Rudham [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Directory information on Broomsthorpe [White's 1845; White's 1883 and Kelly's 1892 [GENUKI-NFK]
East Rudham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Broomsthorpe [GENUKI-NFK]
And see West Rudham
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page