Euston, Suffolk - Kelly's 1883

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Suffolk - Euston

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.871.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling

EUSTON is a parish and village of considerable beauty 3 miles south-east from Thetford and 10 north-east from Bury, in the Western division of the county, Blackbourn hundred, Thetford union and county court district, archdeaconry of Sudbury and diocese of Ely, situated on the eastern bank of the river Thet and near its junction with the river Ouse. Euston Hall, the seat of General the Duke of Grafton K.G., C.B. is a splendid mansion, containing extensive suites of rooms: it is built of red brick and has a large lawn and gravel drives before it: the river Thet passes through on the edge of the lawn and the Hall commands an extensive view of the park, which contains 1,262 acres, and is planted with choice shrubs and trees of great beauty: this is a scene celebrated by Bloomfield in his 'Farmer's Boy': the western approach to the Hall is by a large handsome wooden bridge over the river Thet and thence through a fine shrubbery,: another entrance is from the park north-east: the lawn is here laid out to correspond with the west side and has two lofty pillars at the gate, each being surmounted by a vase of fruit cut in stone and a wreath of flowers entwining it: the Hall and gardens are here divided from the park by a handsome light palisading: the pleasure grounds are 80 acres in extent: about a quarter of a mile north of the Hall is a temple, formerly called the Banquetting Hall; it is a pretty buildng, on a slight elevation in the park, and protected by some trees; it consists of alarge apartment and an upper one surmounted by a handsome dome, commanding an extensive view of the surrounding country: the engtrance is by a flight of stone steps with handosme carved balustrades. The church of St. Genevieve stands in the park and is a pretty building with chancel, nave, aisles and large square tower, the upper part handsomely ornamented: the remains of two Dukes of Grafton are deposited in this church: a very handsome stained east window has been placed in the church to the memory of Henry, fifth duke, as a mark of respect by the tenantry: also a tablet, standing out in relief in one of the north windows over the family pew, in memory of the sixth Duke of Grafton, which was erected by the tenantry of the Euston estate, in his beloved memory, 1882: there is a tomb of Lady Charles L. Fitzroy, who died in December, 1857: against the chancel is a monument to John Cooper, many years steward to the Duke of Grafton: there are several tombs, bearing the date of the sixteenth century and one to Henry Bennet, first Earl of Arlington, 'A' in the Cabal ministry, ob 1685: the churchyard is in a retired situaion; the graves and walks are carefully kept. The register dates from the year 1570. The living is a rectory, consolidated with that of Fakenham Parva and united to that of Barnham, joint yearly value £645, with residence, in the gift of General the Duke of Grafton K.G., C.B. and held by the Rev. Lord Charles Edward Fitzroy M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge. General the Duke of Grafton K.G., C.B. is lord of the manor and owner of the entire village. The soil is light; subsoil, chalk. The chief crops are wheat, barley, oats and turnips. The area is 3,775 acres; rateable value £2,825; the population in 1881 was 231.

LITTLE FAKENHAM is a hamlet 1½ miles south.


Letters by foot post from Thetford, arrive at 8 a.m.; dispatched at 6 p.m. WALL BOX (near the Rectory) cleared at 6.0 p.m. weekdays, & at 10 a.m. on sundays. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Thetford.

There is a Free school, rebuilt by the late Duke of Grafton and supported by the present Duke.

Free School, Miss Minns, mistress

Transcription Copyright ©E.C."Paddy" Apling, August, 2014

More on Euston [GENUKI-SFK]
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