1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1854
Notice of Enclosure [GENUKI-NFK]
Flockthorpe postmill; Hardingham postmill, towermill and watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Local web-site
Hardingham archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Hardingham [GENUKI-NFK]
Parish Information [Andrew Rivett & Geoff Lowe]
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Norfolk - Hardingham

Entry in Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.332.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

HARDINGHAM is a very scattered parish, with a station on the Wymondham and Dereham branch of the Great Eastern railway, 121 miles from London and 5½ west from Wymondham, in the Southern division of the county, Mitford hundred, Mitford and Launditch union, Wymondham county court district, rural deanery of Hingham, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of St George is a stone building, in the Early English style: it has chancel, nave and square tower on the south side containing 1 bell: the tower is very handsome and the original font, sedillia and piscina are preserved intact. The register dates from the year 1699. The living is a rectory, net yearly value £770, with residence, in the gift of Clare College, Cambridge, and held since 1874 by the Rev. Charles Stuteville Isaacson M.A. formerly fellow of that college. The poor have £2 10s. yearly in bread, and £25, rent of 23 acres, for fuel, which is distributed to the poor in coals in the winter. Hardingham Hall, the seat of Henry William Bartholomew Edwards esq. D.L., J.P. is in the Elizabethan style, about 200 years old, and has been much altered and beautified by the present occupier. Hardingham Grove is the property of John Odin Howard Taylor esq. and is now the residence of Sir William Foster bart. D.L., J.P. The Earl of Kimberley is lord of the manors of Flockthorpe and Hardingham. Henry William Bartholomew Edwards esq., J. O. H. Taylor esq., and the trustees of the late Philip William Rose are the principal landowners. The soil is clayey; subsoil, brick earth. The chief crops are wheat, barley, turnips and hay. The area is 2,415 acres; rateable value, £5,172; the population in 1881 was 522.

The chief crops are wheat, barley, turnips and hay. The area is 754 acres; rateable value, £1,396; the population in 1881 was 191.

_____

POST OFFICE, near the Hall.—John Baldwin, receiver: Letters received through Attleborough arrive about 7 a.m.; dispatched at 7 p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Hingham. PILLAR LETTER BOX (near station) cleared about 6.45 p.m. week days.

In 1862 a Church of England school in the Tudor style, with house for the master, was erected by Miss Edwards at a cost of £1,300; the same lady also supports the establishment. The school has recently (1883) been enlarged for 150 children; average attendance 130; Thomas Redford, master; Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Redford, mistress

Railway station, James Johnson, station master.

CARRIER TO NORWICH —Robert Garner, on saturdays

© Transcribed by E.C.Apling, December 1998; links updated February 2010.

Note: ;

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1854
Notice of Enclosure [GENUKI-NFK]
Flockthorpe postmill; Hardingham postmill, towermill and watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Local web-site
Hardingham archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Hardingham [GENUKI-NFK]
Parish Information [Andrew Rivett & Geoff Lowe]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page