Hepworth, Suffolk - Kelly's 1883

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Suffolk - Hepworth

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp.903-904.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling

HEPWORTH is a parish and scattered village 11½ miles north-east from Bury St. Edmunds and 8½ north-west from Finningham station, in the Western division of the county, Blackbourn hundred, Thetford union and county court district, Blackbourn rural deanery, archdeaconry of Sudbury and diocese of Ely. The church of St. Peter is an ancient rubble stone structure, chiefly in the Early English style, with thatched roof, standing on high ground, and consists of chancel, nave, south porch and square western tower containing 5 bells and a clock: it was thoroughly restored and re-seated with open seats in 1855: the font cover, which is of oak, carved with niches for figures, was restored in 1872. The register dates from the year 1688. The living is a discharged rectory, yearly value £498, with residence, in the gift of King's College, Cambridge, and now vacant. The Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship here. The charities of this parish consist of about 44 acres of land, with four cottages, the net proceeds of which amount to about £70 yearky, and are applied under the direction of the Charity Commissioners to the maintenance of the church, the education of the poor, and to the supply of comforts of various kinds to the poor inhabitants of the parish. There is also a fuel allotment of 14 acres, the proceeds of which are expended in coals for the benefit of the poor. Thomas Thornhill esq. M.P., J.P. of Pakenham, who is lord of the manor, the Bury St. Edmunds Guildhall Feoffees and T. T. Methold esq. are the principal landowners. The soil is generally heavy; subsoil clay, some portions mixed. The crops are on the four-course system. The area is 1,650 acres; rateable value £3,170; the population in 1881 was 527.


POST OFFICE.—Thomas Grey, receiver. Letters through Scole viâ Botesdale, from whence they arrive by foot post at 9.15 a.m. & are dispatched on week days at 4.30 p.m. & on sundays at 10.30a.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Walsham-le-Willlows.

There is a good Natonal school for boys & girls, erected in 1852, with residence for the mistress; Miss L. Anscombe, mistress

CARRIER.—John Gudgeon, to Bury St. Edmunds, wed. returning the same evening; other carriers pass through the lower end of the village wed. & sat

Transcription Copyright ©E.C."Paddy" Apling, August, 2014

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