1891 Census Names Index
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Norfolk - Hevingham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.342.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

HEVINGHAM is a parish and widely scattered village 3 miles south from Aylsham and 3 west from Buxton and Lamas station on the Great Esatern railway, on the road to Norwich station, in the Northern division of the county, South Erpingham hundred, Aylsham union and county court district, rural deanery of Ingworth and archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Botolph is a large flint building in the Gothic style and has a chancel, nave, square tower and handsome porch: it was thoroughly restored and re-seated in 1881, and contains a peculiar font, with some figures in Gothic arches sculptured thereon, but much defaced. The register dates from the year 1654. The living is a rectory, yearly value 550, with 33 acres of glebe and residence, in the gift of Sir Thomas Beevor bart. and held since 1878 by the Rev. William Bowles B.A. of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. The rectory is a pleasant building, surrounded by a thriving plantation: the Rev. Harry Dallimore is curate in charge. The Wesleyans, Wesleyan New Connexion and Primitive Methodists have chapels here. The poor's land consists of 8 acres in the parish of Aylsham; 54 14s. the produce of trees cut down on this land, and invested in 3 per Cent. Consols, is also a source of revenue to the poor; also Bulwer's charity of 21 yearly. There is an allotment of 146 acres cut for fuel. Rippon Hall, an Elizabethan brick mansion, is the seat of the Rev. Henry Philip Marsham B.C.L., J.P.; the park belonging thereto, about a mile from the mansion, now containing 180 acres, was granted in 1284 to the Bishops of Norwich who had a palace here and in 1581 Henry VIII. granted it to Sir James Bulleyn, of Blickling, from whom it descended to the Hobarts, afterwards Earls of Buckinghamshire, who sold it to the Marshams in 1659. The Rev. Henry Philip Marsham is lord of the manor of Cats-cum-Cricketots, and chief landowner, and William Forster esq is lord of Hevingham-with-Marsham. The soil is mixed; subsoil, gravel and sand. The chief crops are wheat, roots, barley and hay. The area is 2,855 acres; rateable value, 3,442; the population in 1881 was 764.



POST MONEY ORDER & TELEGRAPH OFFICE & Savings Bank.--Michael Wade, receiver. Letters received from Norwich at 5.30 a.m.; delivery commences at 7 a.m.; dispatched at 5.40 p.m.; sunday 5.25 p.m.

A School Board of 5 members was formed in 1874; Hy. James Gidney, clerk to the Board

Board School, built in 1875 at a cost of 600 for 140 children, average attendance 112; Benjamin Parker, master; Miss Fanny Browne, mistress. The old free school has been incorporated in the Board school

Transcription © Copyright E C ("Paddy") Apling, July 2007; several spelling corrections, December 2009; links updated January 2011.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hevingham Archeology [Norfolk Jeritage Explorer]
Hevingham smockmill [Jonathan Neville]
More on Hevingham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page