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Norfolk - Hickling

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 343.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

HICKLING is a parish 18 miles north-east from Yarmouth, 3 miles from both Stalham and Catfield stations on the Estern and Midlands railway, 8 from Worstead station on the Great Eastren railway, and 18 north-west from Norwich, in the North-Eastern division of the county, Happing hundred, Smallburgh union, North Walsham county court district , rural deanery of Waxham, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The village is of considerable extent and the houses are scattered. About one-third of the parish may be said to be marsh and common lands; the former are drained by water mills. Hickling Broad, an expanse of water of about 700 acres, is used by small craft to communicate with the river Bure. The church of St. Mary is a very fine building of flint and stone, of some antiquity, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, with tower and 5 bells: the church has undergone a complete restoration. The register dates from the year 1653, The living is a vicarage, yearly value £344, with residence,, in th gift of H. S. N. Micklethwait esq. and held since 1849 by the Rev Sotherton Nathaniel Micklethwait M.A. of Magdalene College, Cambridge: this vicarage was founded in the reign of Edward I. The Rev George Sharley, who lives at Ingham, is the curate. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodits have chapels. There are charities which are distributed annually. Poor's land 83 acres producing about £75 distributed in coals, and the widows' acre producing £4. Formerly a market was held here, but it has long been obsolete. A pleasure fair is held on he 23rd of April. Hickling Priory. in which were a prior and nine canons, was founded by Theobald de Valoins, in 1185, and dedicated to St. Mary, St. Austin and All Saints, for canons of the order of St. Austin; Robert Botyld, alias Wymondham, was the last prior in 1503, and with three of the canons subsribed to the king's supremacy, 1534: the ruins of the priory are gradually decaying. Henry Sharborne Micklethwait esq. is lordof the manor and the largest landowner. The soil is fair mixedl subsoil, sand and clay, The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley. The area is 4,334 acres; rateable value, £5,374; and the population in 1881 was 824.


POST OFFICE.—James Turner, sub-postmaster. Letters arrive from Norwich viā Stalham at 7.45 a.m.; dispatched at 2.40 p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Stalham

National School, with an endowment left by the Rev. John Wells of £250 invested in New £3 Per Cent Consos; John Prickett, master

CARRIER TO NORWICH.—Thomas Goose to the 'Three Horsehoes,' saturday

Transcription Copyright © E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, January 2011.

Return to villages index
Paddy's home page
1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
Kelly's 1912 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hickling Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Hickling postmill, early postmill and tower mill [Jonathan Neville]
More on Hickling [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]