1891 Census Names Index
Brief history of Hingham
Blomfield, 1739 on Hingham
Universal British directory 1793
Pigot's 1830 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845, 1854, and 1883
Kelly's 1883 and 1937
Notice of Enclosure [GENUKI-NFK] (search for "Hingham")
Hingham watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham early postmill, Mill Corner tower mill, Deopham Road postmill and towermill and Hardingham Road postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
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Norfolk: Hingham

Entry in the Universal British directory, 1793, pp.374-5.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling, February, 2001.] 1793, pp. 373-5.

H I N G H A M, N O R F O L K

HINGHAM, or as it was formerly written, Hincham, was the head town of the deanery, and at first contained forty-three parishes; the deanery was taxed at thirty shillings, and is was in the bishop's collation It was a considerable town, with a market on Saturday, and three fairs on March 6, White-Tuesday, and October 2. The turnpike-road from Norwich to Watton passes through here, and also the cross-road from Attleburgh to East Dereham, &c. Hingham is twenty-nine miles from Downham, fourteen from Norwich, seven from Watton, and ninety-eight from London. The houses are neatly built, but the streets are irregular. Here is an assembly-room and bowling green at the White Hart inn, and a monthly book club.

The church is a good pile, the tower being very tall and large; the whole was rebuilt by Remigius de Hetherset, rector here, in the time of Edward III. with the assistance of John le Marshall, his patron, who contributed much to the perfecting the work; it is dedicated to St. Andrew the apostle, and had several chapels in it, of which the most remarkable were at the ends of each aisle, that on the north side being dedicated to St. Nicholas, the Nativity of the Virgin, and to her Assumption. There was also a chapel, called St. Mary's, by the rood altar, and another, named St. Mary of Pity; and there were no less than seven guilds held in

the church, each having a stipendiary chaplain, serving at their altars in the church, which constituted a choir. In 1484, Robert Morley, Esq. of this town, was buried in the church, and gave seven surplices to the choir of Hingham; the holy rood or cross stood on the rood-loft, between the church and the chancel. There are several handsome monuments in the church. In 1485. Simon Lyster, of Hingham, was buried here, of whom the following is part of his will:—"Item, I wyll my close in Sculton Sauncey, called Ruttocks, and six acres and a half of land arable, and the rent called Market-house rent, in Hengham, shall be put in foeffment of XII persons, of most godly and best-disposed persons, to th'intent that Rose, my wyffe, shalt have the gydyng of the almes-houses, called John Lister's almes-houses, during her lyfe, bearing all manner of charges and reparations thereof; and to the intent to fynd and kepe a certain number of masses on the said church for ever, for the sowles of John Lister my father, &c. and sowles of me and my wyffe; and also to keep an anniversary day for me the sayd Symond, and the sowles yearly in perpetuum, upon Passion-Sunday at afternoon, with dirige and mass of requiem; be note on the Monday next following, and thirteen-pence to be distributed to six poor or to thirteen at dirige; and also for me by name, and my benefactors, on Hollowmes-day, to be rehersid in the comyn beed [On All-Saints or Hollowmas-day, it was the custom for the common bead-roll of every church to be read and mass said for all the benefactors, whose names were always entered in this roll], and after the decease of the said Rose, the said close to remain in the said foeffee's hands, to the use aforesaid, to be renewed from time to time when but seven of them are left."—In 1506, John Pyshode, alderman of Norwich, ordered in his will, that his executors should make a cross of free-stone, to be set up in the cross-way in the field of Hingham-wood, at the expence of five marks; and, in 1509, Richard Heyhoe, of Hingham, was buried in the church, and gave three acres and an half of land "for an obite yerly, the overplus to the reparation of the church of Hengham."—The church, chancel, two aisles, and square tower, are covered with lead; there is a clock and eight bells; the north vestry is down.—The new parsonage-house was built by the Rev. Mr. John Brewse, M.A. and stands a little south-west of the church. It has since received many improvements by succeeding incumbents.—This town is remarkable for being the source of the river Yar or Yare. [see Note 1 — ECA].

Letters and parcels are sent three times a week to Attleburgh for conveyance by mails and other carriages.

The carriers from Swaffham to Norwich reside at Watton, viz. Edward Clarke, who sets off from his house at Watton to the Currier's Arms, St. Giles's, Norwich, every Monday and Friday. —— Thompson goes to the Woolpack, St. Giles's, Norwich, same days. —— Scar, goes to Golden Dog, same place, on the same days. The above carriers return Tuesday and Saturday.

The following are the principal inhabitants:


Villages in the neighbourhood: Scaulton, distant three miles; the Rev. Mr. Lane, minister, and also of Woodrising [see Note 2], distant two miles and a half. — Hackford (between Rapeham and Folsham) [sic.], distant two miles.— Deeping [= Deopham], three miles; the Rev. Mr. Buck, minister. — Ellingham, three miles south-west; minister, the Rev. Mr. Bond, and also of Little Elllingham adjoining. — Rockling [= Rocklands], four miles; minister, Rev. Mr. Twelves. — Caston, six miles, where is a charity-school. — Carbrook, near Watton, four miles. — Kimberley, distant three miles, where reside Sir John Woodhouse, Knt. and the Rev. Mr. Green. — Rymerstone, three miles; minister Rev. Mr. Grixon. — Morley St. Peter's, four miles, where is the seat of —— Gurning, Esq. St. Peter's is only a chapel of ease to St. Botolph's, the mother-church, from which it lies three-quarters of a mile to the south-west in the road to Attleburgh. — Wicklewood, four miles; minister, Rev. Mr. Colman. Here is a house of industry for the hundred of Forehoe and adjoining hundred. — Wymondham, a genteel populous town, six miles distant, had formerly a market; it is not remarkable for trade or manufactories, but a fine county-bridewell, &c. with penitentiary-rooms. — Cranworth, four miles; minister, Rev. Mr. Rolfe.

[Notes:

Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling, February, 2001; links updated May 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
Brief history of Hingham
Blomfield, 1739 on Hingham
Pigot's 1830 [GENUKI-NFK]
1831 Lewis's Topographical Dictionary [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845, 1854, and 1883
and 1937
Notice of Enclosure [GENUKI-NFK] (search for "Hingham")
Hingham watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham early postmill, Mill Corner tower mill, Deopham Road postmill and towermill and Hardingham Road postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Parish Register information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
More on Hingham [GENUKI-NFK]
Local Web-site Pictures, maps, events, etc
American Connection
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page