1891 Census Names Index
Brief history of Hingham
Blomfield, 1739 on Hingham
Universal British directory 1793
Pigot's 1830 [GENUKI-NFK]
1831 Lewis's Topographical Dictionary [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845 and 1854
Kelly's 1883 and 1937
Notice of Enclosure [GENUKI-NFK] (search for "Hingham")
Hingham watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham early postmill, Mill Corner tower mill, Deopham Road postmill and towermill and Hardingham Road postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Parish Register information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
More on Hingham [GENUKI-NFK]
Local Web-site Pictures, maps, events, etc
American Connection
Return to villages index
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Norfolk: Hingham

William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1883, pp. 322-5.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling, April 1999]

HINGHAM is a small market town, consisting of a large square of good houses and shops, and of several narrow streets, pleasantly seated on rising ground, 14 miles W.S.W. of Norwich, 9½ miles S. by E. of East Dereham, 6 miles W. of Wymondham. 3 miles W. of Kimberley Station, 5 miles N. of Attleborough Station, and 97 miles N.E. by N. of London. It is the polling place of Hingham district of South Norfolk, gives name to a rural deanery in Norfolk archdeaconry, and is in Forehoe division of that deanery, and in Forehoe corporation, hundred, and petty sessional division, Wymondham county court district, and Norwich bankruptcy district. It comprises 3645 acres, and has a rateable value of £9066. Its population was 1203 in 1801, 1539 in 1831, 1698 in 1851, 1605 in 1861 and 1871, and 1554 in 1881. About a mile to the S.E of the parish is a large lake or mere, called the 'Semere,' which covers more than 20 acres, abounds in pike, eels, and other fish, and is supplied by various copious springs, which give rise to a rivulet, flowing eastward to the Yare. The market, formerly held every Wednesday, was revived about the year 1840, after being long obsolete, and is now held on Tuesday, when some business is done in corn, cattle, &c. at the Cock and White Hart Inns. It had three large annual fairs for stock, &c. held March 7, Whit Tuesday, and October 2; but these were abolished in July, 1882. The parish lies partly in the Rectory Manor, and partly in Mrs. Hurnard's manor of Gurney's, but mostly in Hingham Manor, of which the Earl of Kimberley is lord. The common (800 acres) was enclosed in 1781. The manor of Hingham was held during the 13th and 14th centuries by the Marshals, Earls of Pembroke, and passed from them to the Morleys, and from the latter to the Wodehouses. The Hall, a large and handsome brick mansion on the north side of the town, stands on a well-wooded lawn of 50 acres, and commands extensive views. It is the seat of Rawdon Hunter Muskett, Esq., who has considerably improved it. Gurney's Manor, the seat of Mrs. Hurnard, is surrounded by pleasant grounds. A large house near the church is the residence of Charles Crawshay, Esq., J.P., and Sir Thomas Beevor, Bart., is the occupier of one of the principal houses in the square. The CHURCH (St. Andrew) is a noble building in the Decorated style of architecture, of which it is a fine example. It comprises a lofty nave with aisles and clerestory, a spacious chancel, a south porch, and a massive square tower, rising to the height of 120 feet, and containing a peal of eight musical bells. It was rebuilt in 1316, by its rector, Remigius de Hethersete, and its patron, John le Marshal, and has 800 sittings. Several chapels and numerous images decorated its interior, prior to the Reformation. Trinity chapel, at the north-east corner, formerly has a fine stained glass window, with an inscription, which Blomefield read thus:— 'Thys window ys ye mayden cost of Hengham.' from which it was supposed to have been glazed at the cost of the ladies of the town. The nave is separated from the aisles by six finely pointed arches on either side resting on quatrefoil columns. The aisle roofs have shields on the hammer beams. A window in the south aisle was filled with stained glass by the Rev. W. C. Hodgson, in memory of his mother, in 1859; another window in 1874 to the memory of Miss Cockall; and a third, east end of south aisle, to the memory of Rev. M. B. Darby, for many years a resident in Hingham; and at the same time a gallery, which blocked up the magnificent tower-arch was removed, and a new font was obtained, thus considerably improving the appearance of the interior. The church was restored in 1872, at a cost of £3000. A fine open timbered roof of high pitch was thrown over the nave, the aisle roofs were repaired, and the whole church floored and seated with carved open oak benches. The present rector has also opened and restored the western door, and made a new approach to the church from the Attleboro' road. The stone work of the fine belfry windows has also been renewed. The chancel has new carved oak seats, and contains a fine new organ. One of the fine southern windows, which had been blocked, has been opened and filled with stained glass. The three sedilia are in the window bottom, and the piscina is now open to view. The floor of church and chancel slopes from west to east. The altar is raised on five steps, and the flooring of the sanctuary in two stages is of fine Italian marble mosaic, executed in 1880 by Messrs. Burke and Solviate. The church possesses a very fine altar portal of old Italian needlework in gold and silk. On the north side of the chancel is a noble canopied monument, reaching from the floor to the roof, richly decorated with stone imagery and tracery; and though the brass inscriptions are gone, it appears, from the arms remaining, to have been raised to the memory of Thomas, Lord Morley, baron of Rye, and marshal of Ireland, who died in 1435. Here are also tablets of the Watson, Cary, Amyas, Heyhoe, and Browne families, and a brass to the memory of Captain F. Wodehouse. The large seven-light east window is in the Perpendicular style, and is filled with beautiful stained glass, purchased on the Continent by the late Lord Wodehouse, in 1813, and representing in figures as large as life, the Crucifixion, the Descent from the Cross, the Resurrection, Christ in Glory, figures of St. Joseph, St. Anne, &c., all much admired for the beauty and brilliancy of their colours. The rectory, valued in K.B. at £24 18s. 4d., is in the gift of the Earl of Kimberley, and is held by the Rev. Maynard Wodehouse Currie, M.A., who has a good residence, 33A. 3R. 3P. of glebe, and a yearly rent-charge of £1260 12s. 3d., awarded in 1842, in lieu of tithes. In 1605, Robert Peck, M.A., was rector here, and being 'of a very violent schismatical spirit,' he pulled down the rails, levelled the altar, and sunk the whole chancel a foot below the nave; but being prosecuted for it by Bishop Wren, he fled to New England, where he and some of his parishioners founded a new colony by the name of Hingham, in which many of their posterity still remain. He promised never to desert those who emigrated with him; but hearing that the bishops were deposed, he left them to shift for themselves, and returned here in 1646, and died in 1656. Sir Ralph de Hingham, Kt., was a native of the parish, and Justice of the King's Bench, in the reigns of Henry III. and Edward I.; but being found guilty of bribery and corruption he was fined 7000 marks, and as he did not immediately pay he was banished with nine more of the twelve judges, who had been convicted of similar crimes. He ultimately paid the fine, and was made Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, in 1st Edward II. (1307), but died in the same year. The Independents and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel here. That of the former, built in 1836 at a cost of £475, is now under the ministry of the Rev. Philip Davis. Hingham Endowed School was founded, and endowed with a valuable estate, by William Parlett, in 1727, for the support of a master and usher, to teach and instruct freely in the Greek and Latin tongues, and also in English writing, and arithmetic, all the sons of the inhabitants of Hingham, Woodrising, and Southburgh. He directed that the master should be a graduate of one of the Universities, and should have two-thirds, and the usher one-third, of the clear yearly income, and that both should be natives of Norfolk or the city of Norwich. In 1728, Sarah Day gave £40 towards purchasing or building the school, on condition that one boy should be admitted from Scoulton, on the nomination of the minister of that parish. In 1750, Sir John Wodehouse conveyed to the trustees 1½ rood of land, on which a dwelling-house and schoolroom were built. Part of the School Estate was sold for the redemption of the land-tax, and some other parts were exchanged at the enclosure, in 1783. It now consists of a farmhouse, and 122A. 0R. 4P.of land, let for £220 per annum. A new scheme has recently been issued by the Charity Commissioners, which constitutes a governing body of eleven, one ex-officio, viz., the Rector of Hingham for the time being, seven representative, and three co-optative governors. The first co-optative governors are the Right Hon. Earl of Kimberley, R. T. Gurdon, M.P., and H. B. Edwards, Esq. It provides for appointment and dismissal of head-master by the governors, places all school arrangements, appointment and dismissal of assistant masters under sole control of head master, lays down a course of instructions, and provides for three scholarships tenable at the school, and two or three exhibitions capable of being held at a place of higher education. Mr. Thomas Spencer Turner is the present head master; and Mr. A. C. Turner, B.A., of London, usher. The National School for boys, built in 1841, and that for girls, built in 1857, are now used as Sunday-schools only. The SCHOOL BOARD, formed in 1873, now consists of Rev. Maynard W. Currie (chairman), Mr. James Feltham (vice-chairman), Miss E. G. Temple Frere, and Messrs. J. Starke and T. Kingaby. Mr. P. H. Davis is clerk. New schools, having accommodation for 275 children, were built in 1875 at a cost of £2700. The poor have three yearly rent-charges, amounting to £5, left by Francis Seaborn in 1655, Robert Baldwin in 1677, and Christopher Adcock, in 1705. Thomas Heyhoe, in 1708, left 2A. of land (now let for £7), and directed 10s. to be paid yearly for a sermon; 1s. to the clerk, and the remainder of the rent to be distributed in bread among the poor. In 1724, William Thurrold left land for a weekly distribution of bread; and in 1808, it was exchanged for 2A. 3R., now let for £10 a year. Edward Payne, in 1734, gave land for the benefit of the poor, and it was exchanged, about 1808, for 2A. 2R. 8P., now let to ten labourers, at rents amounting to £7 10s. At the enclosure, in 1783, an allotment of 2A. 2R. 24P. was awarded in respect of the above-named charity lands, and is now let for £9, half of which is applied to the use of the church. At the same time a Fuel Allotment of 34A. was awarded to the poor, and it is now let for £30, which is distributed, with most of the other charities, on St. Thomas's day and Candlemas day, chiefly in coals. The Church Estate, purchased with £20 in the reign of Henry VIII., was exchanged, at the enclosure, for 8A. 16P., let for £23 5s. a year.

POST, MONEY ORDER, SAVINGS BANK, and TELEGRAPH OFFICE at Thomas Kingaby's. Letters are received at 7 a.m., and despatched at 8 p.m.

Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling, April 1999; links updated May 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
Brief history of Hingham
Blomfield, 1739 on Hingham
Universal British directory 1793
Pigot's 1830 [GENUKI-NFK]
1831 Lewis's Topographical Dictionary [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845 and , 1854
Kelly's 1883 and Kelly's 1937
Notice of Enclosure [GENUKI-NFK] (search for "Hingham")
Hingham watermill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham early postmill, Mill Corner tower mill, Deopham Road postmill and towermill and Hardingham Road postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Hingham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Parish Register information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
More on Hingham [GENUKI-NFK
Local Web-site Pictures, maps, events, etc
American Connection
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page