1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1950 [GENUKI-NFK]
Ingham Archeology [Norfolk Hritage Explorer]
Mill Farm towermill and Ingham old towermill [both Jonathan Neville]
More on Ingham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
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Norfolk - Ingham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 360.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

INGHAM is a parish and village 9 miles from the navigable Ant, 1½ from Stalham station on the Eastern and Midlands railway, 16 north-east from Norwich and 9 south-east from North Walsham. in the Northern division of the county, Happing hundred, Smallburgh Union, North Walsham county court district, rural deanery of Waxham, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The lordship of Ingham was possessed by a family of the same name, of whom Oliver de Ingham was living in 1183 and John de Ingham in the reign of Richard I. Sir Oliver de Ingham, great grandson of the last, and Seneschal of Gascoigne and Aquitaine and Lord Warden of the Marches of Guyenne, in the reign of Edward III, had two daughters and co-heiresses, the younger of whom, Jean, conveyed Ingham to her second husband, Sir Miles Stapleton, of Bedale, in Yorkshire, who founded a chantry in the church of Ingham, consisting of a warden and two priests, performing service in honour of the Holy Trinity: this became a priory of the order of the Holy Trinity, and to which the church, having been rebuilt, was made collegiate, and appropriated by Thomas Percy, Bishop of Norwich A.D 1360. Ingham Priory became in time the head house of its order in this country, and even imparted to it the name of the order of Ingham, by which it was thenceforward known, as well as by those of the order of the Maturius and of the Trinitarians: at the dissolution the priory lands were granted to Sir William Woodhouse, of Waxham, who afterwards exchanged the priory grange manor, appropriate rectory, and lands with William Rugg, Bishop of Norwich for the priory of Hickling and other possessions, and they are still attached to the see: a portion of the walls of the priory still remains. The church of the Holy Trinity is a large and handsome Gothic building: it consist of chancel, nave, south aisle and south porch, with lofty tower: the chancel was restored by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and the nave and aisles by the vicar, at a total cost of about £3,000: under an arch on the north side of the chancel lies the sculptured figure of Sir Oliver de Ingham, Marshal of Guyenne: on the side of the tomb was the folliwing instriction:— [in Gothic lettering]

at the east end of the church, by the rood-loft, is an altar-monument, with sculptured figures of Sir Roger de Bois and Margaret his lady; the knight is in complete armour, his head resting on the head and body of a Saracen, coupé, and at his feet is a hound, with its paw on a gauntlet: his arms, argent, two bars with a canton gules, over all a fillet sable, are yet visible on his surcoat, and her robe is checked with his arms and her own: it is remarkable that both figures wear the mantle of the same order, having as a badge on the right shoulder a cross pattée, of which the upper limb was removed to make way for a motto, but which is no longer legible: the inlaid brasses in the chancel, which were among the richest in the county, were all stolen in 1800, when St. Mary's chapel was pulled down to save expense of repairing the roof, and the church laid open. The register dates from the year 1801, the previous registers having been destroyed by fire. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £300, including glebe with residence, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1873 by the Rev. Nathaniel Wilson. Here is a Baptist chapel. The poor have a an interest in 17 acres of land in this parish, the rent of which, £26, is given in money; also a charity of £5, left for poor widows, and a charity called need money, arising from land, and producing 30s. yearly. A fair for cattle and stock is held annually on Trinity Monday. The Hall, the ancient seat of the De Ingham Stapletons, has been modernised: there are portions of the old hall standing, and the estate and hall are the residence of Alfred Borrett esq.: Ingham House, owned by George Walter Whittleton esq. but unoccupied, is a substantial white brick house. Mrs. Coustos, formerly Mrs. Whaites, is lady of the manor. The principal landowners are Alfred Borrett, George Walter Whittleton, Robert Ives and William Wenn esqrs. The soil is good mixed; subsoil, sand, gravel and clay. The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley. The area is 1,563 acres; rateable value. £2,566; and the population in 1881 was 452.

POST OFFICE.—.Lewis Francis Myhill, sub-postmaster. Letters through Norwich arrive at 7 a.m.; dispatched at 3.30 p.m. Stalham is the nearest money order & telegraph office

National School. erected in 1865 by the Rev. Isidor Lichtenstein; Miss Nellie Wharton, mistress

Transcription © Copyright E C ("Paddy") Apling, November 2008; links updated November 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1950 [GENUKI-NFK]
Ingham Archeology [Norfolk Hritage Explorer]
Mill Farm towermill and Ingham old towermill [both Jonathan Neville]
More on Ingham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page