1891 Census Names Index for North and South Lopham
North Lopham (White's 1883) and South Lopham (White's 1854)
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
North Lopham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Lopham postmills and smockmill [Jonathan Neville]
Lophams village page [local web-site]
More about North Lopham [GENUKI-NFK]
and see South Lopham
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page

Norfolk - North Lopham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 371-372.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

LOPHAM.—The villages and parishes of North and South Lopham form the straggling town of Lopham, 7 miles west from the Diss station and 4½ south-east from East Harling station; they are in the Southern division of the county, union and hundred of Guiltcross, county court district of Diss, rural deanery of Rockland, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The town is noted for the manufacture of linen, diaper, dowlas and huckaback, principally by small manufacturers, who traverse the neighbouring shires to sell them.

          North Lopham.—The church of St. Nicholas is a fine large edifice, with square tower, built principally of flint: at the south entrance is an old Norman porch, and the outideof the church and round the buttresses exhibit many Latin inscriptions: the chancel was thoroughly restored in 1862. The earliest registers are from the year 1558. The livings of North and South Lopham form a consolidated rectory, yearly value £619, and held since 1861 by the Rev. John Fitzherbert Bateman M.A. formerly fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, instituted 1861; the present rector is also patron, but is bound to present a fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge. The Primitive Methodists have a small chapel here: there is also a Wesleyan chapel with burial ground, and a school room, which is now let to the School Board. A cemetery of a quarter of an acre was formed in 1871, at a cost of £150, and is under the control of a Burial Board of nine members. The town lands and charities are applied by the trustees according to a scheme established by the Charity Commissioners in 1879. for the benefit of the most deserving and necessitous poor of the parish, also in gifts to those of their children who attend school regularly and pass the Government inspection, and to the maintenance and repair of the church. The land is chiefly the property of the Duke of Norfolk; H. R. Garrod esq is lord of the manor. The land is of mixed and heavy soil; subsoil, clay. The chief crops are wheat and barley. The area is 2,009 acres; rateable value, £3,149; the population in 1881 was 674.


POST OFFICE.—Alfred Ruddock, receiver. Letters arrive through Thetford viā Harling; delivered at 9 a.m.; dispatched at 5.5 p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Kenninghall

A School Board of 5 members was formed in 1877; F. Fowell. Garboldisham, clerk to the Board.

National School & master's residence, built 1871, at a cost of £700, obtained by grants from church societies & voluntary subscriptions, in which were included £100, together with the site, from Mrs. G. E. Buckenham & £105 from the rector.

The village of South Lopham, the adjoining parish, is a mile south from that of North Lopham. The church of St. Andrew is in a field: it is a very old building, with tower of great beauty arising between the nave and the chancel, and is of Norman origin: there is a tablet relative to a charity left by William Branch Elliott esq.: the chancel was thoroughly restored in 1866, and the fine Norman arches of the interior of the tower thrown open: the rest of the church was restored and re-seated in 1874, and in 1878 an organ was obtained for the church by voluntary subscription. The register dates from the year 1554. The living is consolidated with that of North Lopham. The town lands and church charities are applied by the trustees, according to a scheme sanctioned by the Court of Chancery, to the maintenance of the church and schools of South Lopham; the yearly surplus, not exceeding one-fourth of the net income, to be distributed amongst the poor who have not received parish relief for six months previously. H. R. Garrod esq. is lord of the manor. The principal landowners are the Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Buckenham esq. and Mrs. Jarrett. The chief crops are wheat, beans, barley and turnips. The land comprises some kindly working loams resting on clay subsoils, and some of a heavy kind, all of which are good corn-growing lands. About a mile east of South Lopham, in the fen or low lands, is Lopham Gate, where there are two springs, from which flow the Little Ouse and the Waveney; the former takes a course through Thetford, Brandon and Lynn, and the latter flows to Yarmouth, and both divide the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The area is 1,937 avres; rateable value. £2,919; the population in 1881 was 529.


POST OFFICE.—Thomas Cox, receiver. Letters received through Thetford viā Harling, at 8.40 a.m.l dispatched at 4.35 p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Harling.

Parochial School, with master's residence, was erected in 1863, at a cost of about £800. Edward Henry Crow, master

Transcription Copyright © E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, January 2011.

1891 Census Names Index for North and South Lopham
North Lopham (White's 1883) and South Lopham (White's 1854)
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
North Lopham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Lopham postmills and smockmill [Jonathan Neville]
Lophams village page [local web-site]
More about North Lopham [GENUKI-NFK]
and see South Lopham
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page