Return to villages index
Paddy's home page
1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Ludham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
How Hill towermill. Lovers' Lane postmill, Malthouse Lane postmill and Ludham High tower mill [Jonathan Neville]
Ludham Bridge North, Ludham Bridge South, Coldharbour, Horsefen and Womack Water drainage mills [Jonathan Neville]
More on Ludham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]

Norfolk - Ludham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 372.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

LUDHAM is a parish and small town, near the navigable Bure, 2 miles south-west from Potter Heigham station, on the Eastern and Western railway, 12 from Norwich north-east-by-east and 13 from Yarmouth north-west, in the Northern division of the county, Happing hundred, Smallburgh union, Tunstead [sic. actually Happing] hundred, North Walsham county court district , rural deanery of Waxham, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich; it formerly had a market and a fair, grated by Elizabeth to Bishop Redman; the market is given up, but the fair is held on the Thursday and Friday after Triity Sunday, chiefly for pleasure. The church of St. Catherine is a handsome stone building, in the Later English style, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, wth a square embattled tower containing 5 bellsL the chancel, which is separated from the nave by a richly carved screen, was thoroughly restored in 1861. The date of the earliest register in 1583. The living is a vicarage, yearly value 298, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich, and held since 1855 by the Rev. Henry Walker M.A. of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, Here are Baptist and Wesleyan chapels. About 60 is annually divided among the poor, the proceeds of land given at the Enclosure. This place, after the dissolution of the abbey of St. Bene't-at-the-Holme, to which the manor belonged, was given by Henry VIII, to the Bishop of Norwich, who converted the Grange into an episcopal dwelling: the greater part was burnt down in 1611, but the palace was restored and enlarged by Bishop Harsnet, who built a chapel of brick, which, after the bishop ceased to dwell here, was converted into a granary, and the reminder of the edifice into a farmhouse, now called Ludham Hall. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners, who are lords of the manor, Mrs. Hacon, Thomas Sliper, William Augustus Page, Ash Rudd, Alfred Neave, William Frederick Green and Aaron Neave esqrs. are the chief landowners. The soil is mixed; subsoil, sand and brick earth. The chief crops are wheat, oats, barley &c. The area is 2,977 acres; rateable value, 5,363; the population in 1881 was 796.


POST, MONEY ORDER OFFICE & Savings Bank.—John Thomas Thurgood, sub-postmaster. Letters from Norwich at 9 a.m.; dispatched at 2.35 p.m. on weekdays & 10.25 a.m. on sunday. Telegraph office at Martham

Assistant Overseer, Alfred Page

A School Board of 5 members was formed in 1872; Horatio Girdlestone, clerk to the board

Board School. buit in 1873 at a cost of 1,350, for 140 children, average attendance 100; William T. Robinson, master

CARRIER TO NORWICH.—Thomas William Thurgate, to the 'Waggon & Horses.' mon, wed. & sat

Transcription Copyright © E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, January 2011.

Return to villages index
Paddy's home page
1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Ludham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
How Hill towermill. Lovers' Lane postmill, Malthouse Lane postmill and Ludham High tower mill [Jonathan Neville]
Ludham Bridge North, Ludham Bridge South, Coldharbour, Horsefen and Womack Water drainage mills [Jonathan Neville]
More on Ludham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]