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Ludham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
How Hill towermill. Lovers' Lane postmill, Malthouse Lane postmill and Ludham High tower mill [Jonathan Neville]
Ludham Bridge North, Ludham Bridge South, Coldharbour, Horsefen and Womack Water drainage mills [Jonathan Neville]
More on Ludham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]

Norfolk - Ludham

Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, pp. 492-493

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, December 2002.]

LUDHAM, 13 miles N.E. by E. of Norwich, is a large and well-built village, and parish, comprehending 982 souls, 215 houses, and 2,894a. 2r. 36p. of land, bounded on three sides by the Bure, the Thurne, and the stream which flows from the Broads near Catfield. It is in three manors, called W alton Hall, Ludham, and Ludham Bacon, of which the bishop of Norwich is lord, and principal owner of the soil; the whole being granted to the see by Henry VIII, (in exchange for other estates) after the dissolution of the abbey of St. Bennets-at-the-Holm, to which this parish belonged. This monastery stood in the adjacent parish of Horning, but the abbot had here a residence and farm, called the Grange, which was afterwards used as the Bishop's Palace, but the greater part of it was burnt down in 1611 ; since which the domestic chapel has been converted into a granary, and the remains of the palace into a farm house, called Ludham Hall. The Church, dedicated to St. Catherine, is a spacious and beautiful structure, with a tower and five bells, and has recently undergone considerable repairs at the joint expense of the parishioners and the vicar. It contains a gothic screen of elaborate workmanship, with saints and bishops painted in the lower compartments, and a fine old font enriched with carvings. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the King's book at £5 6s. 8d., and in 1831, at £303. The bishop of Norwich is patron and appropriator of the rectorial tithes, and the Rev. W. A. Bathurst, M.A. is the incumbent. About 314 acres are tithe free, and the rent charge on the remainder is £243. The Baptists and Wesleyans have each a chapel here. Bishop Redmor, in the time of Elizabeth, had the grant of a fair and market for Ludham, and the former is still held as a pleasure fair on the Thursday and Friday after Trinity Sunday. A National school was built in 1841. Of the three allotments awarded at the enclosure, one of them occupies 77a. 2r., let for £30 ; another 11a. 2r. 4p., let for £12 ; and the other, 30a. 2r. 8p. let for £21 per annum. These sums are expended in coals for the poor, together with £12 5s. a-year, arising from 8a. 2r. 5p. awarded at the enclosure, in lieu of land left by P. and F. Haddon, in 1630, and other donors ; and 50s. a-year as the interest of £50 derived from the sale of the "Town House," in 1790.

Post Office at Robt. Newton's, Crown Inn ; letters arrive at 11.15 a.m. and are despatched at 1.50 p,m. [sic]

Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, November 2002; links updated January 2011.

Return to villages index
Paddy's home page
1891 Census Names Index
Happing hundred
Smallburgh union
Norwich county court district
Kelly's 1883
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Ludham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
How Hill towermill. Lovers' Lane postmill, Malthouse Lane postmill and Ludham High tower mill [Jonathan Neville]
Ludham Bridge North, Ludham Bridge South, Coldharbour, Horsefen and Womack Water drainage mills [Jonathan Neville]
More on Ludham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]