1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
Lewis' 1831 [GENUKI-NFK]
Marham postmill and smockmill [Jonathan Neville]
Marham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Marham [GENUKI-NFK]
Other Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
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Norfolk - Marham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.589.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

MARHAM ia a parish and village, 8 miles north-east from Downham, 5 soth-west from Narborough station and 7 west from Swaffham, in Clackclose hundred, Downham union and county court district, rural deanery of Fincham, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of the Holy Trinity is a large building, consisting of chancel, nave, south aisle and a lofty square tower, built with quoins of freestone, containing a good peal of 6 bells: about the year 1844 the chrch was re-roofed and some beautiful stained windows added, some of which were presented by Henry Villebois esq.: 20 years later the churchyard was considerably enlarged, and in 1867 the whole of the interior was restored and re-seated, at a cost of 1,500; of this amount 250 was contributed by St. John's College, Cambridge, for chancel impovements, the remainder of the expense being defrayed by Henry Villebois esq, and by subscription: in the church is a very ancient tomb, with recumbent effigies (made from the native chalk) of John Steward esq. and Anne his wife (daughter of Humphrey Shouldham esq.), who were buried here in 1603-4. The register dates from the year 1562. The living is a vicarage, in the gift of St. John's College, Cambridge, and held since 1868 by the Rev. Henry Josiah Sharpe M.A. late fellow of that college: the tithes were commuted in 1840, the rectorial at 640, and the vicarial at 371 yearly, with 11 acres of glebe: annexed to the vicarage is a house, with 2 acres of land: also land in the parish of Rockland [ presumably, though which Rockland is not clear], producing about 55 yearly. The Wesleyans amd Primitive Methodists have each a chapel here. In 1799 two poor allotments were awarded under the Enclosure Act, containing 200 acres of fen land; in 1869-70 a scheme was devised under the authority of the Charity Commissioners, by which the above allotments have been let; they now produce about 120 yearly, the net proceeds being distributed in coals, amd a few of the cottages have turf under the direction of the trustees. There was formerly a nunnery belonging to Ely Abbey, founded for Cistercians. in 1251, and granted at the Dissolution to Nicholas and Rybert Hare: some remains of it may be seen at a farm-house and outbuildings a little west of the church, and joining Abbey Farm, now in the occupation of Mr. William Goodwyn. Marham House, the delightful mansion of Henry Villebois esq. D.L., J.P. was principally built in 1861. Mr. Thomas Brown, the well-known breeder of Cotswold sheep. resides at the Hall. The Winearls family have resided at Eastgate for nearly three centuries. Thomas Leigh Hare esq. is lord of the manor of New Hall and Shouldhan, and Henry Villebois esq. D.L., J.P. of Old Hall and Westacre. The chief landowners are Thomas Leigh Hare, Henry Villebois, R. C. Winearls, Henry Winearls esqrs. and Mr. John Reynolds. The soil is sand and peat; subsoil, principally chalk. The chief crops are roots, barley, seeds and wheat. The area is 3,966 acres; rateable value, 4,500; the population in 1881 was 752.

© Transcribed by E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, July, 2009; links updated May 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
Lewis' 1831 [GENUKI-NFK]
Marham postmill and smockmill [Jonathan Neville]
Marham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Marham [GENUKI-NFK]
Other Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page