1891 Census Names Index
Lewis's 1831 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Marsham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Bolwick watermill (Marsham) and Marsham postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Mill Farm postmill [JOnathan Neville]
More on Marsham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
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Norfolk - Marsham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.390.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

MARSHAM is a parish and considerable village 2 miles south from Aylsham station on the East Norfolk branch of the Great Eastern railway and 3 north-west from Buxton station on the Great Eastern railway and 10 north from Norwich, on the road to Norwich, in the Northern division of the county, South Erpingham hundred, Aylsham union and county court district, rural deanery of Ingworth and archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich. The church of All Saints has a chancel, nave and square tower containing 8 bells, an ancient screen, and font carved with the Sacraments of the Catholic Church and figures representing saints, confessors and St. George and the Dragon: the chancel has memorial stones on the Norris and other families. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a rectory, yearly value 281, in the gift of the Earl of Lichfield: the Rev. John Gunton B.A. of Christ's College, Cambridge, has been the incumbent since 1844, by whom, assisted by Queen Anne's Bounty, a rectory house has been built: there are 66 acres of glebe, and the tithes have been commuted for 344. The Primitive Methodists have a chapel here. Buxton Reformatory is situated in this parish, but adjoining the parish of Buxton: it was originated by Sir Edward Buxton, and Messrs, George Kett, John Henry Gurney, and John Wright, but chiefly by the latter gentleman, under the following circumstances:—Previous to this establishment being opened, young boys were sent to Buxton Old Union, where tradesmen from Norwich and neighbourhood went to procure apprentices for their various trades from among them:; on one occasion a chimney sweeper, wishing to have a boy from there, picked out several successively as likely to suit him, but, in each case, their parents objected; at last, a little boy was pointed out to him who had no friend or relation to care for him; he was one of those "waifs and strays" of this world, so the master sweep was told he would have no trouble about him; no one would inquire what had become of him; "the sweep" was about to remove the boy, but the late John Wright esq. happened to be present at the time, and turning round, said--"What! because this boy is friendless is he to be forced into a trade where boys who have friends are not allowed to be placed? No! he shall not:" this was the incident which first made him think of endeavouring to found this establishment, and, as he used jocularly to remark, "Buxton Reformatory sprang from soot;" he then, in conjunction with the above-named gentlemen, had a meeting in St. Andrew's hall, Norwich, and the result was the opening of this place in 1853; it was then for boys or young men who had been confined in Norwich Castle, and who, wishing to lead a different life, volunteered to come here for a short term till they could quit their career of crime and lead an honest life; it was taken over by Government and certified for criminals in 1855: it is a square red brick building with the governor's house in front and in the centre of a large courtyard: it has a beauiful view fom all sides, and a flower garden in front: there is a large plot set apart for a playground in fine weather, also a covered-in playground for use in bad weather; the boys are instructed in seamen's duties, for which purpose there are two masts rigged in the playground, and they are also taught shoe-making, tailoring, farming and agricultural duties; for the latter purpose there are 40 acres under cultivation by spade: it is calculated that from 90 to 95 per sent of the boys sent here are reclaimed, as shown by the inspector's report, and the success of the institution is proved by the fact that the majority of the boys years after they have left the reformatory, correspond with the governor, who frequently has visits from old inmates, while others, who are too far off to visit him, send photographs of themselves, wives and families, and it is interesting to look upon some of their cartes as taken when they are brought here, and as they appear now: the boys attend church in the parish; there is room for from 55 to 60 boys in the Reformatory, and at present there are 46; the expenses average about 1,000 yearly. The charities are 36 12s. 7d. yearly. There are 181 acres of heath land allotted for fuel. Here is a building used for the purpose of lectures and entertainments, called the Mutual Improvement Institution. Bolwick Hall, the seat of Charles Louis Buxton esq. J.P. is locally in the parish of Aylsham, but for postal purposes is more conveniently given here. Marsham Hall, occupied by the Rev. Charles Benjamin Leupolt, rector of Brampton, is a large plain white building, resembling an old-fashioned, substantial farm-house. The principal landowners are Charles Le Neve esq. Thomas Henry Case esq. and Charles Louis Buxton esq J.P.. The soil is sand and loam; subsoil, gravel and clay. The chief crops are wheat, roots, barley and hay. The area of the parish is 1,819 acres, about 333 of which are taken up by woods and heath; rateable value, 2,370; the population in 1881 was 554.



POST OFFICE.--Thomas Crane, postmaster. Letters through Norwich delivered at 7.30 a.m.; dispatched at 5.30 p.m. The nearest money order & teklegraph office is at Aylsham

Here is a school supported by the rector & a voluntary rate; Eli Grimsley, master; Mrs. Caroline Grimsley, mistress

Buxton Reformatory, Thomas Babbington, governor; Mrs. Elizabeth Anne Babbington, matron; Walter Cannel Claxton, school master; Luke Edwards, shoe maker; James H. Smith, labour master

Transcription © Copyright E C ("Paddy") Apling, July 2007; links updated January 2011.

1891 Census Names Index
Lewis's 1831 [GENUKI-NFK]
White's 1845 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Hunt's 1850 [GENUKI-NFK]
Marsham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Bolwick watermill (Marsham) and Marsham postmill [Jonathan Neville]
Mill Farm postmill [JOnathan Neville]
More on Marsham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page