1891 Census Names Index
Wills of John Willer, 1821 and 1839
Ebridge watermill, Lingate towermill, Norwich Road tower mill, Reeve's Lane towermill, Swafield Road postmill
       and Yarmouth Road postmill [Jonathan Neville]
North Walsham archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
North Walsham Town Council
Pictorial tour of North Walsham
More on North Walsham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
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Norfolk - North Walsham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 538-540.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

NORTH WALSHAM is a parish and market town and station on the Great Eastern line from Norwich to Cromer, and also one on the Eastern and Midlands railway and is a polling-place for the northern division of the county, in Erpingham union, North Erpingham hundred [see Note below], North Walsham county court district, rural deanery of Waxham, archdeacory of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich: it is 14¼ miles north from Norwich, 25 south-west from Yarmouth and 128 from London, pleasantly situated on an eminence between the rivers Ant and Bure: it is paved and lighted with gas, and governed by a Local Board of Health of 12 members. The Dilham and North Walsham canal passes through and terminates at Antingham. The church of St. Nicholas is an ancient building, which has been restored at a cost of about £5,000: it consists of a chancel with chancel aisles, nave, aisles and south porch, which is of flint and stone: the spandrels of the entrance arch bear the arms of John of Gaunt and of St. Benet's Abbey: on the north side of the chancel is a monument to Sir William Paston, ob. 1608: the font has a cover of carved oak, rising in a succession of arches, buttresses and pinnacles in four tiers, the whole surmounted by a pelican; through the liberality of W. Forster esq. of Aylsham, a large and handsome window, of the Decorated style, filled with cathedral glass, has been inserted at the east end, and a reredos and communion-table presented to the church: the reredos, which is divided into five compartments, is of Caen stone, and the arcade is supported by sixteen polished Rosso marble shafts, the spandrels being richly inlaid with Devonshire green, antico, alabaster and jewels: carved diaper relieves the surface of the panels, and the centre one contains a cross of black polished marble, having a base of polished grey Ipplepen marble: the communion-table is of oak, and its brackets are beautifully careed with representations of the grape, wheat, barley, wild convolvulus and other foliage, interspersed with some exquisite specimens of small birds; a rich velvet embroidered cloth covers the table, and is the gift of the same gentleman, who has also furnished the sacrarium with two elegant gas standards: Mrs. Martin Shepheard, the lay impropriator, at a cost of £510, has provided the chancel with a new roof of English oak, covered in lead, similar in its character to the old roof, and on bay of the nave and two bays of the north aisle were, at the same time,. newly roofed, at an expense of £290, by subscription: an organ has been erected, at a cost of £487, and is placed in the north chancel aisle; its case is of plain pine, having an ornamental diapered front. The register dates from the year 1557. The living is a vicarage, with the rectory of Antingham St. Margaret annexed, joint value £415, with 2 acres of glebe, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich, and held since 1874 by the Rev. John Smith Owen, M.A. LL.D. of Trinity College, Dublin. In this parish are Congregational, Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist chapels. The Congregational chapel, erected in 1857, at a cost of abut £1,000, is a handsome Gothic structure of flint, with stone dressings. There are a few charities, the funds of which are derived from the rental of an allotment of 34 acres to the poor, the amount (£60) being distributed in coals. Here are two agricultural implement manufactories. An Agricultural Show is held annually, and there is a Horticultural Society. The market is on thursday, chiefly for corn. The market cross was built by Bishop Thirlby in the reign of Edward VI. and was repaired by Bishop Redman in 1690, and again restored in 1856, and also in 1882. On North Walsham Heath, beside the road to the city of Norwich, is a stone cross, said to mark the field of battle in 1381, when the rebels, headed by John Leicester, a dyer from Norwich, were defeated by Henry Spencer, the warlike Bishop of Norwich. The White Horse Spa and Blue Bell commons, to the north-east of the town, were enclosed about the year 1850, and many houses have since been built upon them. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners are lords of the manor; and Lord Suffield, Mrs. Petre and R. S. Baker esq. are the chief landowners. The parish comprises an area of 4,252 acres; rateable value, £13,259; and in 1881 the population was 3,234.

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COUNTY MAGISTRATES FOR TUNSTEAD & HAPPING PETTY SESSIONAL DIVISION.

[Note: This directory, and later editions, at least up to 1937, give North Walsham as in North Erpingham hundred; it is, however, situated well within the boundary of Tunstead hundred shown in the Phillimore edition of Domesday Book, and is also so listed in the "Hundreds" listing in those directories, and is therefore included in both hundreds in the index page]

© Transcribed by E.C.("Paddy") Apling, June 2005; links updated February 2011.

1891 Census Names Index
Wills of John Willer, 1821 and 1839
Ebridge watermill, Lingate towermill, Norwich Road tower mill, Reeve's Lane towermill, Swafield Road postmill
       and Yarmouth Road postmill [Jonathan Neville]
North Walsham archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
North Walsham Town Council
Pictorial tour of North Walsham
More on North Walsham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page