List of 1891 Census Names Indexes for parishes in Norwich City
Agreement between James BARBER of Aylsham and Charles CLAY of Norwich [Linda Steward]
Jenny Lind (founder of Children's Hospital) [Eastern Daily Press]
Norwich Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer[
Norwich Catholic Cathedral [Simon Knott]
Holy Apostles Jesuit Chapel [Simon Knott]
Ancient church of St. Clement, Conesford [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Francis, Heartsease [Simon Knott]
{Modern] church of St. Mary Magdalene [Simon Knott]
Norwich City [Methodist] Church [Simon Knott]
Bowthorpe Road Methodist Church [Simon Knott] Church of St. Alban, Lakenham
Church of St. Barnabas, Heigham [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Bartholomew, Heigham [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Catherine [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Helen [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Thomas [Simon Knott]
Friends' Meeting House, Gildencroft [Simon Knott]
Hillcrest Chapel [Simon Knott]
Holy Trinity Church [Simon Knott]
Oak Grove Chapel [Simon Knott]
Potter's House Church (Dereham Road Baptist Church) [Simon Knott]
Our Lady Mother of God Catholic chapel [Simon Knott]
Roseberry Road Methodist Church [Simon Knott]
Seventh-Day Adventist Church [Simon Knott]
Silver Street Baptist Church [Simon Knott]
Sprowston Methodist Church [Simon Knott]
St. Lukes Church Centre [Simon Knott]
St. Peter Park Lane Methodist [Simon Knott]
Swedenborgian Chapel [Simon Knott]
Trinity URC church [Simon Knott]
Witard Road Baptist Church [Simon Knott]
Heigham tower mill [Jonathan Neville]
New Mills [Jonathan Neville]
More information on Norwich [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
More on Norwich [GENUKI-NFK]
Kelly's 1912 for Thorpe Hamlet GENUKI-NFK]
More on Thorpe Hamlet [GENUKI-NFK]
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Norfolk - Norwich

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 403-411

[Description only, with details of County Court and Norwich Incororation on Page 2. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

[Note: - Pending the transcription of the full entry, particular questions about this directory entry will be gladly answered by the transcriber.]

NORWICH

NORWICH is in the east centre of an oval which forms the shape of the county of Norfolk: it is on the navigable river Winsome, just above the junction with the Are: it is a city and county of itself, the seat of a bishop's see, municipal and parliamentary borough, assize town of the shire, place of election and polling place for the Southern division of the county, a union and county court town and railway station; it is 113½ miles from London, 20 west from Yarmouth, 48¼ east-by-south from Lynn. 23¼ west-north-west from Lowestoft, 53¾ from Ely, 68½ from Cambridge, 45½ from Ipswich. 62¼ from Colchester and 43 from Bury St. Edmunds.

There is connection with the general railway system of the county by the Great Eastern railway and its connections, and local railways to Yarmouth, Lowestoft, Lynn, Wells, Hunstanton, North Walsham and Cromer, also the new Eastern and Midlands railway to Lynn. There are two independent channels to the sea, by the river Yare to Yarmouth and by the Waveney to Lowestoft. As a manufacturing city, no less than by its great population, it is one of the most important places in England.

Norwich has not lacked historians, and all concur in ascribing to it an origin of considerable antiquity: in 575 it is said to have been fortified by Uffa, the first king of the East Angles, who built the castle and made it his residence; and in 642, Anna, king of the East Angles, kept his court in the royal palace at the Castle. In the time of Alfred the Great it was attacked by the Danes and became the capital of Guthrum. The place rose to importance, and had a mint; and in the reign of Edward the Confessor it had 25 churches and 1,320 burgesses. In 952 Eldred made Norwich a borough, governed by a sergeant or officer, appointed by the king to keep his courts and collect his revenues In 1004 Bishop Herbert de Losinga moved the see here from Thetford, and founded and endowed the cathedral and built the episcopal palace. In 1336 a number of Flemish weavers, driven out of their country by an inundation, settled here and greatly improved the worsted and clothing trades: in 1565 a further immigration of artisans took place, in consequence of the persecutions in the Netherlands. In 1348 Norwich was visited by a pestilence, which carried off 57,000 persons in seven months out of the then population of 70,000. In 1403 the city received a new charter from Henry IV, by which it was ever to be governed by a mayor and sheriffs elected by the citizens, and thereby became a county of itself. William Appleyard was the first mayor of Norwich. In 1413 the sixty common councilmen and twenty-four aldermen were first instituted, who constituted the corporation.

The city and county of the city is now governed by a corporation, consisting of a mayor, sixteen aldermen and forty-eight councillors, with a sheriff, under-sheriff, recorder judge of the county court, town clerk, clerk of the peace, coroner, gaoler, superintendent of police, four sergeants-at-mace, water bailiff and bellman. The revenues of the corporation, exclusive of the amount received from borough rates, are about £12,000.

There is a separate commission of the peace for the city, holding quarter sessions and daily sessions : the borough court is held every day : there are also a court of pleas and a court of conscience,

The city returns two members to Parliament.

In 1867 an Act of Parliament was obtained for draining the city, which has been completed at a cost of about £120,000: the plan was to construct two main drains, one on each side of the river Wensum, to carry the sewage to Trowse, where a pumping station has been erected to pump the sewage over land, at Crown Point, that has been purchased for that purpose.

The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, founded by Bishop Herbert Losinga, in 1096, after the removal of the see from Thetford to Norwich in 1094, is a stately edifice, principally in the Norman style, and invaluable as an illustration if the pure Norman ground plan, which it retains in a manner almost unchanged since its erection.

{1.) The choir with its aisles, the transept and central tower, were completed by the founder, who carried his work as far as the altar of the Holy Cross (afterwards St. William's) in the nave; Bishop Everard, who succeeded him in 1120, continued the nave and aisles westward, and in 1150, the remains of St. William, the boy saint (crucified by the Jews in 1137, or March 10th, 1144) were translated into the apse; a fire in 1171 damaged the structure, but it was repaired by Bishop de Furbes (1151) and John of Oxford, bishop from 1175, finished the work continued by Everard ; in 1243-58, Bishop Walter de Suffield erected a Lady chapel at the extreme east end; this building, a rectangular structure of considerable size, 57 by 36 feet, was, however, removed by Dean Gardiner in the 16th century to save the cost of repairs. Violent conflicts between the monks and the populace, which broke out on August 11, 1272 , resulted in the partial destruction of the cathedral and its adjacent buildings. but in 1275, the citizens were ordered to pay 3,000 marks towards its restoration, and on Advent Sunday, 1278, it was reconsecrated by Bishop Walter (or William) de Middleton (1278-88) in the presence of Edward I. and his queen; aspire of wood, covered with lead, erected by Bishop Ralph Walpole in 1295, was blown down by a terrible storm of wind, January 15, 1362, was superseded in 1364-9 by a new spire of stone, finished by Bishop Thomas Percy (1354-70) are repaired by Bishop Walter Lyhart (1445-72); the cloisters, begun by Walpole in 1297, were finished in 1430, the south walk being the work of Bishop Salmon (1299-1325) who also erected the greater part of the charnel house, the palace hall, three bays of the gallery, and a chantry chapel : about the middle of the 14th century two chapels, one on the north side and the other on the south side, were erected about midway between the transepts and the side chapels of the apse, openings being cut through the walls, and the Decorated stone arches, supported on columns, inserted so as to connect these, like the other chapels, with the aisles; St. Andrew's chapel, on the north side, is entirely destroyed, and that on the south side, the Beauchamp chapel, built by Bishop Lyhart, has lost its original character, having been altered from the Decorated to the Perpendicular style during the 15th century : considerable alterations were made in the upper part of the presbytery in the middle of the 14th century, about which time Bishop Percy erected the present clerestory. Bishop James Goldwell (1472-99) spent 2,200 marks upon the repairs of the spire (struck by lightning in 1463), the erection of a chantry chapel, and the reconstruction of the vaulting of the choir, to sustain which, he reared a series of flying buttresses, adding a clerestory in the Perpendicular style : in the middle of the 15th century Bishop Alnwyk built the present west entrance to the nave and a large window over it, and his successor Bishop Lyhart. the stone vaulting of the nave ; and early in the 16th century the north and south transepts were vaulted with stone by Bishop Richard Nix (1500-1536).

{2.) The cathedral, as at present existing, is a cruciform structure, consisting of apsidal choir of four bays, with aisles and lateral chapels; transepts, with an ancient apsidal chantry or sacristy projecting eastward from the north wing, nave of fourteen bays, and a central tower with spire, 315 feet in total height, and containing 5 bells; the total length, formerly, with the lady chapel, 464 feet, is now 407 feet, the width, including the aisles, 97 feet, and the height to the centre of nave vaulting, 69 feet ; the vaulting over the presbytery is 83 feet in height from the floor; the breadth across the transepts 178 feet, and the height of the vaulting 73 feet.

{3.) The choir terminates eastward in a pentagonal apse, the lower portion of which still retains the double-arched entrance, which formerly led to the now destroyed lady chapel ;westward, the choir is continued two bays into the nave, but the stalls do not reach further than the lantern ; these 62 in number, are of oak, in the Perpendicular style, canopied and pinnacled, and have curious misericords; in the central bay of the apse, upon a small platform, are fragments of the Bishop's throne, and on the pavements and the nearest pillars traces of the three steps which led up to it, according to the Basilican arrangement; the clerestory is mixed Decorated and Perpendicular, a vaulting with elaborate bosses covering the central avenue; the windows, each of four lights, are set between canopied niches; the choir aisles are continued round the apse, forming an eastern processional path, which opens into two radiating chapels of circular form, each with a semi-circular apse projecting eastward . the Jesus chapel on the north, and St. Luke's on the south, the latter serving also as parish church of St. Mary in the Marsh, which originally stood a short distance south-east of the cathedral, within the precincts, and was destroyed in 1563; its Perpendicular font now stands in this chapel; opening from the south choir aisle in the Beauchamp chapel, a Decorated work, and there was a corresponding chapel of St. Stephen attached to the north choir aisle, which has at the east end an Early Decorated porch-like gallery, probably the chamber of an anchorite, and once communicating with an exterior building, called the Sanctuary men's chamber, or Relics chapel; the eagle lectern is Late Decorated; a rich screen on either side of the choir, with niches, canopies, and an open parapet rising to the floor of the triforium, conceals the pillars and aisles, and the choir screen of Bishop Brown encloses it at the west end.

{4.) The transept is without aisles, but has in the north wing the eastern apsidal chapel of St. Anne; the corresponding chapel in the south wing has given place to a Decorated sacristy of the 15th century, vaulted, with an upper chamber; the vaulting bosses of the transept exhibit, in a series of nearly 90 sculptures, the story of the Nativity, but the work is later than and inferior to that of the nave; the south wing is finished on the exterior with square embattled turrets on wither side of the gable, arcaded at the summit, and terminating in crocketed pinnacles.

{5.) Above the crossing, raised on massive piers, rises the magnificent tower, the loftiest and richest example of a Norman tower in England ; it consists of four stages, three of which are surrounded with arcading, and the fourth displays patterns of lozenges and circles alternately; the Decorated battlements are adorned with shields, and at the angles are square embattled turrets, with crocketed spirelets, of the same date as the great octangular spire, which is adorned with a double row of circles, five one each face, richly crocketed, and capped with an elegant filial.

(6.) The nave, in its simple majesty, is the largest, grandest, and most interesting of any in the country, but is out of all proportion, as regards length, to the rest of the fabric; on either side are seven double bays, with piers, alternately round and square, supporting an open triforium, of disproportionate size, the arches of which, heavy and circular, are too nearly of a height with those of the arcade below; the painted windows of the clerestory, each of two lights, appear through the centre arch of the arcading, with three arches in each bay; and above these spreads a superb vaulting of stone, of Perpendicular date, adorned with 328 elaborately sculptured bosses, illustrating the history of the world, from the Creation to the Doom, which have been admirable described by Dean Goulburn in 1876. (7.) The south aisle in of uncommon height and has three storeys, with an embattled parapet; in the north aisle is a door leading to the green-yard, where there was anciently a preaching cross; both aisle have been filled with late tracery. (8.) The west front, although possessing the advantages afforded by a surrounding open space and forest trees, is wanting in dignity and importance, and consists simply of a gable between two turrets crowned with spirelets, while on either side extend the ends of the aisles, three storeys in height, with embattled parapets, and the original Norman turrets flanking each angle; the chief entrance is through a recessed doorway within a square head, with four canopied niches, above which is a rich Perpendicular window on nine trefoiled lights, filled in 1854 with stained glass, as a memorial to Edward Staley D.D. Bishop of Norwich, 1837-49; a small light is set in the head of the gable, which terminates in a cross.

(9.) The cloisters adjoining the cathedral on the south side, and in part occupying the angle between the nave and south transept, date from 1297-1430, and are only inferior in size to those of Salisbury, being 177 feet in length on the west and east sides and 176 feet on the north and south, with a height of 15 feet; at the north-west angle are a slype, and outer or great parlour; in the west alley are the Early English door of the guest-house and the lavatories, formed by enclosing arches recessed in the wall, with a low screen, panelled and enriched with carved foliage, while at the back are narrow canopied niches, enclosing pedestals; in the East alley are the processional door, with radiating tabernacles, three niches for book aumbries, and the beautiful triple doorway of the now destroyed chapter house, which projected 80 feet eastward and had a polygonal apse; the vaulting of the cloisters is particularly fine, and has richly sculptured bosses; the dark cloister at the south-east angle led to the infirmary; three late Norman pillars of its hall, built by Bishop John of Oxford 1175-1200, still remain; west of the cloisters are a guest hall and cellarer's apartments, and between these intervenes a Normal building, the purpose of which is unknown; on the south side were the refectory and kitchen.

(10.) Immediately opposite to the west front of the cathedral is the Erpingham gate, erected between 1411 and 1420 by Sir Thomas Erpingham; it is a very early example of the ornamental Perpendicular flint work, peculiar to the eastern counties, and forms a stately structure, with two demi-octangular buttresses profusely sculptured, and has thirty-eight small statues, as well as shields, figures of birds and foliage, and over the entrance the effigy of the founder, with his motto "¥enk," i.e. "thank"; the charnel chapel of St. John the Evangelist, standing obliquely between this gate and the cathedral, was built by Bishop Salmon in 1316, and consists of a chapel built over a crypt, which has a double row of columns 14 feet high, and many-foiled round windows; some distance south of these stands St. Ethelbert's or the Court Gate, built by the citizens about 1272, with a hanging upper chapel of black flint in the Decorated style.

(11.) On the north side, in St. Martin's plain, is the Palace or St. Martin's Gate, erected by Bishop Alnwick, about 1430' near it is the bishop's Palace, a considerable pile, dating from the foundation of the church, and embracing every subsequent style : very extensive restorations and alterations have been carried out by the present prelate, Dr. Pelham, under the able guidance of Ewan Christian esq.; and the private chapel which stands a little in advance of the palace eastward, was built by Bishop Salmon about 1320, and was thoroughly restored and refitted: during the prelacy of Bishop Hall (1641-61) this chapel suffered much from the hands of the Puritans, who destroyed all the paintings, demolished all the stained glass windows, and stripped and sold the lead from the roof; it was, however, restored by his successor Bishop Reynolds (1661-76) about the middle of the 17th century : in the palace gardens are the remains of a Decorated chapel, 130 by 30 feet, and of the Palace hall 100 by 60 feet, built in 1299-1325, and destroyed by Cromwell, as well as the basement of a gate-house erected by Bishop Salmon, and a kitchen of the 13th century.

(12.) The principal monuments in the cathedral are those of the following: Bishop Herbert Losinga, ob. 1091, a modern altar-tomb erected in 1682; Prior W. Walsham, 1218; Sir Thomas Erpingham, 1420, low tomb; Sir Thomas Wyndham, vice-admiral, 1421, an altar tomb; Bishop John Wakeryng, 1426; Bishop James Goldwell, 1499, with canopied effigy; Sir William Boleyn, 1505, great-grandfather of Queen Elizabeth; Sir John Hobart, attorney-general to Henry VII; Bishop Richard Nykke or Nyx, 1536, a flat tomb, arched over with iron work for the sacring bell of the chantry chapel; Bishop John Parkhurst, 1575; Lady Elizabeth Calthorp, 1582; and Chancellor Miles Spender, an altar tomb of the 16th century on which the tenants formerly paid their rents; there is also a statue in Carrera marble, by Chantrey, to Bishop Henry Bathurst, who died in 1837.

(13.) In the sacristy the table of the reredos of the Jesus chapel (1380-1400) has pictures on the panel, of the 14th century, in five compartments, representing the closing scenes of the Life of Our Lord; the heads are treated in the Italian manner, and the grouping is that of Siennese school.

(14.). Many important internal restorations have been carried out in recent years by Dr. Goulburn , the present dean, and a new clock with chimes, presented by Mrs. Goulburn, has been placed in the tower.

The parish churches are numerous and ancient.

All Saints, in Westlegate street, is a small flint building, in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, north aisle and a tower containing 3 bells; the church has a richly-sculptured octagonal font and a few mural tablets, and will seat 150 persons. The register dates from the year 1573. The living is a rectory, consolidated with St. Julian, net yearly value £250, with 168 acres of glebe, in the gift of the Rev. Henry Clement Scunthorpe B.A. vicar of Beeley, Derbyshire, and held since 1868 by the Rev. William Kant LL.B. of London University and M.A. of Glasgow.

St. Andrew's in Broad street, in size the second parish church in the city, is a large flint and stone Perpendicular structure, rebuilt A.D. 1506, consisting of chancel, lofty nave, aisles and square tower containing 10 bells: there are several ancient monuments, one to Sir John Suckling and his wife; another to Francis Rugg, thrice mayor of Norwich : there are sedilia, a credence, a fine-toned organ and several stained windows : a fine clock, with Cambridge chimes has been lately (1883) added. There are sittings for 700. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £265 from 121 acres of glebe land, in the gift of the parishioners and held since 1850 by the Rev. Arthur Charles Copeman M.B., T.A.K.C.L. honorary canon of Norwich cathedral, rural dean of Norwich and Bishop's commissary.

St. Augustine's church, in St. Augustine street, is a plain ancient building, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles and square tower. Sittings for 240. The Register dates from the year 1558. The living is a rectory, yearly value £170, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1877 by the Rev. William Alexander Elder B.D. of Corpus Christi college, Oxford.

St. Benedict's church in St. Benedict's street, is an ancient building of flint, in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave, north aisle and a round tower with octagon top containing 3 bells : the edifice has been restored. There are 200 sittings. The register dates from the year 1563. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £114, in the gift of the parishioners and held since 1881 by the Rev. Edward Frank Edwards of St. Aidans.

St. Clement's, in Collegiate street, is an old church of flint with stone dressing, chiefly in Perpendicular style : it consists of cancel, nave and square tower with 3 bells: in the churchyard, opposite the south door, is the tomb of the parents of Archbishop Parker, who resided here : adjoining, the west wall is a tomb, without any inscription, but known as the "Leper's tomb," which, tradition says, was raised over the remains of a leper : there are sittings for 350. The register dates form the year 1538. The living is a rectory, united with St. Edmunds in 1882, joint yearly value £243, in the gift of Caius College, Cambridge, and held since 1842 by the Rev. Richard Rigg M.A. of that college.

St. Edmund's, in Fishgate street, is a plain and small fabric in the Perpendicular style, with chancel, nave, south aisle and west tower with one bell: the church was restored in 1882: sittings for 425. The register dates from the year 1550. The living is a rectory, united with St. Clement's in 1882 by order in Council, joint yearly value £243, in the gift of Caius College, Cambridge, and held since 1842 by the Rev. Richard Rigg M.A. of that college.

St. Etheldred's, in King street, is an old church of flint and brick, in the Norman and Perpendicular styles, consisting of chancel, nave, small tower, round at the bottom and octangular at the top, and 1 bell: there is a monument in the chancel of William Johnson, in the habit of an alderman, with his son behind him, on his knees, holding a book ; opposite to him his wife is kneeling, behind her are three daughters also kneeling; dated 1611 : the church has been restored at a cost of £700. The register dates from the year 1665. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £90, united with St. Peter's Southgate, yearly value £50, in the gift of the trustees of the and held since 1882 by the Rev. Nathaniel Bolingbroke B.A. of Queen's College, Cambridge.

St. George's, Colegate, is a large and substantial structure, in the Perpendicular style: it consists of chancel, nave, aisles and a lofty embattled tower with 3 bells: there is a good organ and a stained east window: there is a monument to John Herring esq. (mayor in 1799), and a handsome tablet erected by subscription, to the memory of the eminent artist, John Crome, founder of the Norwich School of Artists, a native of this city, who was born in 1761 and died in 1821, and is generally known as 'Old Crome,' to distinguish him from a later artist of the same name : there are sittings for 380. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £98, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1874 by the Rev. John Laine le Pelley M.A. of Caius College, Cambridge.

St. George's, Tombland, is a large and handsome edifice in the Perpendicular style, with portions of an older date: it consists of chancel, nave and aisles, and is remarkable for its fine commanding square tower, which has 5 bells and a clock : there is a good organ, a very handsome pulpit and some stained windows: one to Dr. Sutton and two to the memory of Miss Hudson, the latter the gift of her nieces: there a few ancient monuments, one of which is of the founder of the Great Hospital. The church has recently (1883) undergone restoration. The register dates form the year 1538. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £144, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1842 by the Rev. Kirby Trimmer BA of St. Alban Hall, Oxford.

St. Giles', situated at the top of St. Giles' street, is a handsome building of flint stone in the Perpendicular style; it has a lofty nave, with good open timber roof, divided from the aisles by handsome pillars, and a tower 120 feet high containing 8 bells, and was thoroughly restored in the year 1867, at a cost of £4,500: here are several handsome monuments, a few brasses and a good organ. There are 600 sittings. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £70, in the gift if the Dean and Chapter and held since 2859 by the Rev. William Nottidge Ripley M.A. of Caius College, Cambridge.

St. Gregory's, in Pottergate street, is a flint building of great antiquity, in the Perpendicular style, but it has gone through various alterations and improvements: the interior and roof have been restored : it consists of chancel, nave, aisles and two small chapels and tower containing clock and 2 bells: here are a few brass inscriptions and two ancient monuments, one of Sir Francis Bacon, a judge of the King's Bench in the reign of Charles II. the other of Sir Peter Seaman K.T.: the chancel has a handsome stained window : there is a curious fresco painting of St. George and the Dragon and an ancient brass eagle lectern. The register dates from the year 1571. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £135, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1878 by the Rev. John Jessopp M.A. of St. John's College, Cambridge J.P. Herts.

St Helen's, in Bishopsgate street, is an ancient edifice, consisting of chancel, nave south porch, transepts, cloisters and a square Perpendicular tower with 1 bell: there is a very fine piece of groining in the south transept, representing The Ascension of the Virgin Mary: the church is fitted with open seats, and there is a fine-toned organ : Kirkpatrick, the celebrated antiquary, who assisted in compiling Blomfield's History of Norfolk, is buried here: this church formerly belonged to the monks, and stood in the precinct opposite the hospital, which being demolished more than 300 years ago, the church became converted to the use of the hospital, and hence the hospital is called St. Helen's church: it is part of the establishment of the Great Hospital, as now called, and the parishioners of St. Helen's have the liberty of using it for divine worship: the trustees of the Great Hospital are required by charter to keep the church in repair. The register dates from the year 1678. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £200, to which Queen Anne's Bounty adds £6 5s. yearly, in the gift of the trustees of the Great Hospital and held since 1881 by the Rev. Albert John Porter LL.B. of St. John's College, Cambridge, and surrogate.

St. James with Pockthorpe is an ancient small Perpendicular edifice and has a tower with 1 bell and contains an organ: the font is very ancient and richly ornamented; the panels are filled with figures representing the Apostles and the Evangelists and eight female saints: the building is in very dilapidated condition, and funds are much needed for its restoration. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £150, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1872 by the Rev. Alfred Davies M.A. Clare College, Cambridge.

St. John's, Maddermarket, a flint and stone building in the Perpendicular style, has nave, aisles, tower and 6 bells: there are some fine brasses, also a monument to Lady Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, who was interred here in 1563: the church was thoroughly restored in 1868, at a cost of £1,200: there is a fine Decorated east window. There are 461 sittings. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a discharged rectory, yearly value £110, with 40 acres of glebe, in the gift of New College, Oxford, and held since 1882 by the Rev. Charles Henry Pilkington M.A. formerly fellow of that college.

St. John de Sepulchre, at the top of Ber street, is a large flint building, in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, transept, a lofty tower and 5 bells: the east window is stained, in memory of the Rev -- Stone, formerly vicar; the church was restored in 1866; there are sittings for 300. The register dates from the year 1559. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £129, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1876 by the Rev. Joseph John Gurney MA of Merton College, Oxford.

St. John's of Timberhill, in Ber street, is a flint building in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, south porch and two small chapels: the tower fell in 1784: there is now a stone bell-cot containing 1 bell: there is a piscina: the interior of the church was restored in 1874 and a considerable portion of the fabric in 1878: sittings for 400. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £215, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1871 by the Rev. Edward Ram T.A.K.C.L.

St. Julian's, in King street, is a small ancient building of flint, in the Norman style, consisting of chancel, nave, north porch, a small round tower, and a stained window : the interior was restored in 1871, open oak benches taking the place of the old pews and the chancel was raised and laid with fine Minton tiles: sittings for 150. The register dates from the year 1589. The living is a rectory, consolidated with All Saints', joint yearly value £233 with 163 acres of glebe, in the gift of the Rev. C. F. Scunthorpe and held since 1880 by the Rev. William Kant LL.B. London University and M.A. Glasgow.

St Lawrence, in St. Benedict's street, is a handsome edifice of flint, with freestone dressings in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave aisles, north and south porches and a lofty tower containing 6 bells: there are several old brasses. There are sittings for 600. The register dates from the year 1559. The living is a rectory, yearly value £135 in the gift of the Lord Chancellor and held since 1878 by the Rev. Arthur Armitstead Davidson M.A. of Magdalen College, Oxford.

St Margaret's with St. Swithin's, between Lower Westwick street and St.Benedict's street, is a small building of flint, with freestone dressings, consisting of chancel, spacious nave, south aisle, small chapel and tower containing 2 bells. There are sittings for 300. The register dates from the year 1567. The living is a rectory, yearly value £175, principally derived from 105 acres of glebe, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1881 by the Rev. John Gough Poole T.A.K.C.L.

St. Martin's-at-Oak, in Oak street, is an ancient fabric, in the Perpendicular style, and so called from an oak tree formerly standing in the churchyard, in which was placed an image of the Virgin, called "Our Lady in the Oak:" it consists of chancel, nave, south aisle and tower with 3 bells. There are sittings for 300. The register dates from the year 1656. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £110, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1858 by the Rev. Charles Caldwell, of St. Bees.

St. Martin's-at-Palace, in Palace plain, is an old flint and stone building, in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and tower with 1 bell: there are some handsome stained windows: the east window represents The Adoration of the Magi, Crucifixion, Resurrection, Annunciation, Bearing the Cross and Carrying the Sacred Body to the Sepulchre: the church underwent a thorough restoration in 1854 and an organ was added in 1863: the tower was restored and raised to its original height in 1874, and the organ enlarged by the addition of a swell and pedal pipes : there is a full choral service every Sunday evening with a large surpliced choir. There are 755 sittings. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a rectory, yearly value £153, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1871 by the Rev. Alfred William Lovely Rivett.

St. Mary's, in Coslany street, is a handsome cruciform structure, in the Perpendicular style, it consist of a chancel having a panelled ceiling with rich perforated work, with nave, transept, south porch and lofty round tower at the west end with 6 bells: in the north wall if the chancel is an Elizabethan tomb, with the figures, raised in stone, of Martin Van Kurnbeck M.D, and Joanna his wife; the pulpit is ancient and panelled. The church has been partially restored and reseated and will seat 250. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £70, in the gift of the Marquis Townshend and held since 1882 by the Rev. Arthur Frederic Rivers.

The church of St. Mary-in-the-Marsh stood in the precincts, about 100 yards south-east of the cathedral: it was destroyed in 1563 and the Dean and Chapter then granted the parishioners the use of St. Luke's chapel and the aisle of St. John the Baptist, in the cathedral, for the purpose of holding their services and burying their dead: this arrangement is still in force and St. Luke's chapel is now used for all the purposes of a parish church. The register dates from the year 1591. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £87, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1879 by the Rev. William Thomas Moore M.A. of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and minor canon of the cathedral.

St. Michael's, or St. Miles, in Coslany street, is a large ancient building, with a lofty square tower and a fine peal of 8 bells, and, with the exception of the south sidle, which is Early English, the architecture is entirely Perpendicular: the interior is beautifully decorated: the altar-piece represents The Resurrection and The Four Evangelists: there are a few ancient brasses. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a rectory, yearly value £90, in the gift of the Church Patronage Society and held since 1881 by the Rev. Sydney Augustus Selwyn M.A. of Caius College, Cambridge.

St. Michael-at-Plea, in Queen street, is an ancient cruciform flint stone building, consisting of chancel, nave and two transepts, low tower and 1 bell: there are a few brasses and mural monuments and some old panel paintings. The church will seat 200. The register dates from the year 1539. The living is a rectory, yearly value £85 with 40 acres of glebe, in the gift of Sir T. B. Lennard bart. and J. Morse esq. and held since 1839 by the Rev. Charles Morse LL.B. of Queen's College, Cambridge.

St. Michael-at-Thorn, in Ber street, is a small edifice in flint stone, in the Perpendicular style; it has chancel and nave, tower and 3 bells, and a very ancient Norman porch: the church has been restored. There are sittings for 379. The register dates from the year 1562. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £110, in the gift of Constance Marchioness of Lothian and held since 1876 by the Rev. William Frederic Creeny M.A. of St. John's College, Cambridge.

St. Paul's, in St. Paul's square, is small, chiefly in the Perpendicular style, with nave, north aisle, and a low round tower containing 1 bell: the church has been restored, with the addition of an apse chancel. There are sittings for 430. The registers date from the sixteenth century, and, excepting the oldest, are in a good state of preservation. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £150 in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1862 by the Rev. Michael Satterthwaite Jackson. In 1882 the churchyard was laid out as a garden, the expenses being paid by John Gurney esq. of Sprowston.

St. Peter, Hungate, on Elm Hill, is an ancient cruciform structure of flint, consisting of chancel, nave, transept and square tower with 2 bells: the east window is stained: in 1871-72 the interior of the church was restored, the nave being now seated with chairs: an organ with 2 manuals was placed in the church in 1875, the cost being defrayed by private subscriptions. There are sittings for 150. The living is a rectory, yearly value about £120, in the gift of the Lord Chancellor and held since 1871 by the Rev. William Ballyman Hull M.A. late scholar of Pembroke College, Oxford.

St. Peter Mancroft (Magnæ Croft Castelli) which stands in the Upper Market place is the largest and most magnificent parish church of the city. The original building was Norman but was replaced in the fifteenth century by the present church which is a splendid example of the Perpendicular style: it consists of a chancel and nave with lean-to aisles, a tower 98 feet in height surmounted by four angle turrets, and a handsome flèche covered with lead: the columns of the nave with the clerestory windows above are singularly light and graceful, and the roof of the nave and chancel is a good specimen of fan tracery rising from the stone shafts supported on corbels: below the communion table, which rises six steps above the floor of the nave, is a passage with a groined roof, the greater part of the church being built over a crypt adapted to the rise of the hill, and forming the platform on which the church was erected: at the extreme east end is a Lady chapel, used of late years as a vestry: there is a peal of 12 bells: the font stands under a remarkable canopy supported by pillars, and formerly surmounted by a richly decorated font cover: only one baptistery of a similar character, that is in Trunch church, is to be found in Norfolk: the east window is filled with old stained glass, which has been admirably imitated in another window in the chancel in memory of R. Seaman esq.: there are a few ancient brasses, one in memory of Sir Peter Reade, and several mural monuments, the most worthy of notice being one in memory of Sir Thomas Browne kt. M.D. the author of "Religio Medici": the communion plate is exceedingly good, consisting of a large and handsome cup and paten of the time of Elizabeth, 1568, silver gilt; a superb cup and cover, given by Sir Peter Gleade knight in 1633, embossed with a representation of Abigail bringing gifts to David; a large flagon and other vessels silver gilt: the whole of the exterior of the church as been recently restored, under the superintendence of the late G. E. Street esq. at a cost of £13,000. There are 1,000 sittings. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £200 in the gift of the parishioners and held since 1881 by the Ven. Henry Ralph Nevill M.A. of University College, Oxford, archdeacon of Norfolk.

St. Peter-per-Mountergate, in King street, is a flint building in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave and tower with 5 bells: there are some ancient stalls in the chancel and the body of the church is seated with open benches: a handsome organ has been added: a tomb within the chancel has upon it recumbent figures of R. Berney esq. and his wife, dated 1623: there are two memorial windows, one erected by J. Underwood esq. of the firm of Messrs. Hills & Underwood, and the other by J. Underwood esq. of Norwich. There are sittings for 400. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £86, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1873 by the Rev. William Hudson M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge.

St. Peter-at-Southgate, in King street, is an old flint stone building in the Perpendicular style: it has chancel, nave, small chapel, south porch. square tower, and is now closed, having fallen into decay. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a rectory, yearly value £50 in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and is united with St. Ethelred's and held since 1882 by the Rev. Nathaniel Bolingbroke BA Queen's College, Cambridge.

St. Saviour's, in Magdalen street, is a small ancient flint edifice in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, with western gallery, with a square embattled flint and stone tower with 2 bells, and a clock: the chancel is Decorated and the south porch is used as a baptistery : the font is peculiar, the stem, consisting of four shafts, resting on lions' heads, carried through ogee canopies, with pinnacles between. The register dates from the year 1555. The living is a rectory, yearly value £260, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1856 by the Rev. William Harris Cooke M.A. of Corpus Christi college, Cambridge.

SS. Simon and Jude, on Elm hill, an old church in the Perpendicular style, has chancel, nave and a low square tower: there are several ancient and curious monuments, some to the Pettus family, who left endowments to the parish, and in the register is an entry showing that four knights, who came to Norwich with the Earl of Norwich in the reign of Henry VI. and who were killed in the engagement at Mousehold, with Kett, the Wymondham tanner, were buried in one grave in the chancel. There are 450 sittings. The register dates from the year 1539. The living is a rectory, yearly value £65, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich: the Rev. Richard Deare Pierpoint M.A. is the officiating minister.

St. Stephen's, situated at the top of Rampant Horse street, is a handsome edifice of flint in the Perpendicular style: it consists of chancel, north transept, nave and aisles, which are divided from the nave by fluted columns with Pointed arches and tower on the north side: the roof is a beautiful specimen of open timber work; the church is seated with open oak benches: there are several brasses, a fine organ, and a handsome reredos has been placed in the chancel: several of the windows are filled with stained glass, three as memorials to the Brownson family. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £330, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1875 by the Rev. James Wilson M.A. of Jesus College, Cambridge.

St. Swithin's with St. Margaret's, standing between Lower Westwick street and St. Benedict's street, is an ancient flint building in various styles of architecture: it has chancel, nave, aisles and had a small square embattled tower which was taken down by the City authorities in 1881: it contains ancient brasses and fragments of old stained glass. The church is not now used, being in a very bad state of repair. The register dates from the year 1700. The living is a rectory, yearly value £105, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1881 by the Rev. John Gough Poole T.A.K.C.L.

The following are ecclesiastical parishes:-- St. Philip's formed in 1868. The church, which is situate in the Heigham road, built from designs of E. Power esq. of London, in 1871, is a handsome structure in the Early French style, of flint, with stone dressings: it consists of chancel, nave, aisles, square tower and clock. The register dates from the year 1871. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £300, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich, and held since 1877 by the Rev. Sydney Linton M.A. of Wadham College, Oxford. There are sittings for 800. St. Philip's Rooms, formerly the temporary church, are now sued as Sunday schools and for parish purposes. The parish of St. Philip contains a population of 6,230.

Holy Trinity Church, South Heigham, in Essex street, was erected in 1860 and consecrated in 1861, and a district formed in 1867: its interior length is 130 feet, and it will hold 1,200 persons: it is in the Decorated style, and has a chancel, nave and transepts, tower containing 1 bell and a handsome shingled spire. The living is a rectory, yearly value £300, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1875 by the Rev. John Callis M.A. of St. Catherine's College, Cambridge: adjoining the church, a rectory-house was built in 1869.

Christ Church, New Catton , is an ecclesiastical parish, formed in 1842 out of the parish of St. Clement. The church is a cruciform flint stone building in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave and transept with bell turret. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £150, inthe gift of the rector of St. Clement's and held since 1882 by the Rev. Walter Samuel Wright BA of Corpus Christi college, Cambridge.

Trinity Presbyterian church, situated in Theatre street, is an enlargement of St. Peter's Hall: the building is in the Lombardo-Gothic style of white brick with Bath stone dressings: in the centre of the front is the entrance, which is a triple doorway, oak circular-headed doors, with Scotch granite columns supporting the moulded arches: in the centre is a large rose window, and at the south-west corner is a square campanile, with windows and arcading, and covered with a pointed slate roof, surmounted by an iron filial, in all 100 feet high: the interior of the church is light and airy, fitted with pitch pine benches, varnished: the new portion is surmounted by a gallery, which is approached from the tower by a stone staircase: the windows are all glazed with tinted cathedral glass in leadwork of geometrical design: it is lighted by sun-burners and handsome brass brackets, and heated by hot-air apparatus: it will seat about 650 persons.

A Catholic cathedral is now (1883) in course of erection on the site of the old city gaol.

The Catholic church of the Holy Apostles, in Willow lane, a white brick building in the Corinthian style, is 90 feet long and 40 feet wide, with a highly decorated interior and windows filled with stained glass: the altar-piece is very handsome; the decorations have been renewed, and a side altar erected to the Sacred Heart of Our Lord: there are several statues in the church.

St John's (catholic), in St. John's street, Maddermarket, is an ancient brick building.

The Jewish Synagogue is in Synagogue street: there is a meeeting house for the Society of Friends in Upper Goat lane. The Catholic Apostolic church is in Queen street.

The Baptist church, Unthanks road, erected in 1874-5, is in Early Gothic style, built with Kentish rag and Bath stone dressings, with nave, separated from the aisles by an arcading of stone arches supported upon red Mansfield stone columns: the nave is lighted by a large 5-mullioned window at the east end and by 10 clerestory windows at each side: the roof is open-timbered and divided into panels by the moulded principals and purlins: the windows are glazed with cathedral glass in lead, with a coloured border: the east end of the church has a large octagon-shaped apse, choir and organ, and is lighted by three large stained windows: the pulpit is situated in the north side at the entrance to apse, and is connected with the vestry; on the other side of the apse are the vestries and lavatories, and a staircase leading to school-room and side entrance: the church will seat 650, and cost, exclusive of spire, about £6,000.

The Baptists have also places of worship in Collegiate street, Pottergate street, St. Mary's plain, Timberhill street, Pitt street, Gildencroft, Sayers row, Heigham, Surrey road and Southgate street.

The Princes Street Congregational church was erected by the Rev. John Alexander in the year 1819: it was considerable enlarged and improved in 1869 under the pastorate of the Rev. G. S. Barrett BA: the building is in the Composite order of Grecian architecture: the façade is a pedimented front in white brick, with centre and side doors: the interior is elegant, has galleries on three sides and the ceiling is divided into panels by moulded and enriched beams, surrounded by a large cove: it is well lighted by circular-headed windows: there is an apse at the end in which is placed a very fine-toned organ: the seating is in varnished deal, with moulded bench ends: the walls and ceiling have been coloured and chastely decorated, and altogether the church is a good specimen of its style, and seats about 1,100: Mr. Board man, of Norwich, was the architect for the enlargement. The same denomination have churches in Priors yard, Collegiate street (Old Meeting House), and one in Chapelfield was finished in 1858 at a cost of £2,000; it also has Sunday schools at Mariner's lane and Trowse, attended by about 550.

Princes Street Congregational Lecture hall and Sunday school, erected in 1879-80, is a classical structure of white brick, moulded and enriched, and consisting of semi-basement, ground and first floors, the former although 12 feet 6 inches high by taking full advantage of the incline of Redwell street is only partially underground, and contains large infants' school room, mothers' meeting room, church parlour, class rooms, ladies retiring room, lavatories for all the school children, there is also a kitchen, and below is the heating chamber to warm the whole building with hot water, assisted by open fires in some of the rooms: the ground floor contains an assembly or school room 62 feet long by 39 feet wide, with fourteen rooms arranged all round, eleven of which are class rooms the remainder being for secretary, library and superintendent's private rooms: there is a separate entrance from the church alley to the library, but with this exception all the surrounding rooms are approached only from the large room, which has wide stone staircases from the upper and lower corners of Redwell street, providing complete means of egress in case of panic: on the first floor from a gallery 8 feet wide, running on three sides of the large school room, are approached fifteen other rooms all used for class rooms except one opened as an apse for an organ to the large room, the stone staircase at upper and lower corners of Redwell street also supply the means of ingress and egress to this floor with an additional outlet to the present vestries, attached to the Congregational church: the assembly room is 24 feet tot he springing of a large plaster panelled coved ceiling with lantern the whole length to give light, the height from floor to top of lantern being 44 feet, and will seat (with folding doors of end class rooms open) about 700: the size of class rooms varies from 12 feet by 10 feet to 20 feet by 11 feet. Mr. Edward Boardman, F.R.I.BAô was the architect. The cost of the building, including the site, was about £13,000.

The Primitive Methodists have chapels in Cowgate road, Dereham road, Queen's road, New Catton and Nelson street. The Unitarian chapel is in Colegate street. The United Methodist Free Church have chapels in Calvert street and Chapelfield. The Wesleyans have chapels in Ber street and Lady's lane. There is a Wesleyan Free church at South Heigham and a Wesleyan Reform chapel in Belvoir.

The Dutch church, so called from having been leased at one time to the Dutch residents of this city, is now used by the English Presbyterian church.

The Public Cemetery, constructed in 1856, is in Dereham road, and has an area of 40 acres, with 4 mortuary chapels. The Rosary Cemetery, at Thorpe Hamlet, held by shareholders, was opened in 1821, occupying about 12 acres of ground with 1 mortuary chapel.

King Edward the Sixth's Grammar School is situated west of the cathedral: it was founded in 1547: by decree of the Court of Chancery, in 1858, the school was changed it its arrangements and is now under the management of 16 trustees or governors: the Rev. Canon Heaviside is now chairman and J. J. Colman, esq. M.P. vice-chairman of the governing body: the foundation is divided into a "Grammar" and "Middle" school, with entirely distinct school buildings and masters; the fees payable at the Grammars school are £16 10s. yearly, and at the Middle school £6 6s. a year; several valuable exhibitions and prizes are provided for from endowments: admissions are obtained by application to the governors: boys are eligible when eight years of age; the masters also take boarders: the Grammars school is in the Close: the Rev. O. W. Tancock M.A. is head master: many names of eminence are to be found upon the list of pupils; amongst others, Archbishops Parker and Tenison, the late Sir James Brooke, Rajah of Sarawak, and Horatio Viscount Nelson, who for a short time was a pupil of the school: a statue to his memory has been placed in the Upper close, facing the portico of the school: the Middle school is in Bridge street. of which Thomas Richmond Pinder esq. LL.B. is head master.

The Diocesan Training Institution situated on St. George's plain, was founded in 1852, for training schoolmistresses, and is under Government inspection and in connection with the National Society: it is supported by grants from the Committee of Council on Education and voluntary subscriptions.

The Boys' Hospital, St. Edmund's, endowed with about £1,600 a year from estates and funded property, provides for the education of 100 boys; and the Girls' Hospital, New Lakenham, has an income of about £900 from estates and funded property, for the maintenance, education and training for domestic service of between 30 and 40 girls. Norwich Asylum and School for the Blind was first started by Thomas Tawell esq. of this city, who, about the year 1805, purchased a mansion in Magdalen street, with four acres of garden ground attached, and offered them as the basis for an institution for the benefit of the indigent blind; this establishment was enlarged in 1872, and now receives 50 inmates. The Hon. and Right Rev. the lord Bishop of Norwich is the president. Norman's Charity school, founded by Alderman Norman in 1723 for the sons of persons related to himself or his first wife, endowed with over £700 a year, provides for the education of about 90 scholars, and each foundation scholar, in addition to a free commercial education, receives a payment of £8 yearly, and at the age of 14 an apprentice fee of £15, and at the age of 22 a gift of £10 to commence business with. Here are schools for nearly all denominations.

There is a Magdalen Asylum or Female Home, and many minor charities for distribution of money and kind.

The Guildhall is a large and ancient building, chiefly of flint, and was built in the fifteenth century: it contains portraits of early mayors and benefactors, a sword presented by Nelson, and the city regalia. The assizes and quarter sessions for the city and daily petty sessions are held here. The city police and fire brigade occupy the basement.

St. Andrew's Hall, whose history, lie its architecture are internal decorations, si so completely a combination of the civic and the ecclesiastical, was the nave of the conventual church of the Black Friars, and now forms one of the finest Gothic halls in the kingdom: it contains a numerous collection of civic portraits: it is used for political, religious, or commercial meetings, permission from the mayor and town council being first obtained: an organ by Messrs. Bryceson has been erected in the hall.

The Corn Exchange was built in 1826, at a cost of £6,000, and is in the Grecian style: the roof is glass: it contains full-sized portraits of the founder, John Culley esq. and Thomas W. Coke, afterwards Earl of Leicester.

The Castle is of ancient foundation, and from its elevated position is one of the most striking buildings in the city: it consists of the some Saxon arches, and a great Norman keep, 110 feet long, 92 feet wide, and 70 feet 9 inches high, surmounted by battlements: this keep, with other buildings, to which additions have been made, is now used as the county gaol;: around the castle are some well planted gardens and a common terrace walk above, commanding a panoramic view of the city and neighbourhood: the principal remains of the ancient building are the shell of the keep, a massive structure on the summit of an artificial eminence, and Bigod's tower, a fine specimen of the Norman style: over the fosse, an ancient stone bridge of one circular arch, of 40 feet span, is still entire, and is considered to be of Saxon architecture: the outer walls, of which only some small portions are remaining, formerly enclosed an area of 23 acres. on part of which the new county gaol was erected: it contains 225 cells, and was erected in 1822. There are remains of the White Friars' convent, and of the Benedictine nunnery at Carrow: also curious houses, called Falstaff's Palace and Surrey Houses.

The Shire Hall, adjoining the Castle, is a spacious edifice, erected in 1822: the assizes and quarter sessions for the county are held here: this being the county town, the election of the knights of the shire regularly takes place here. There is a subterranean passage and ascending shaft communicating with the gaol in the Castle.

The County Police Station is to the north-west of the Shire Hall

The Volunteer Drill Hall, situate in Chapel Field, is a large building, in the Castellated Gothic style, built of flint and red brick, opened in the year 1866: it is 144 feet long and 62 feet wide: the tower is part of the old city wall.

The Agricultural Hall, at the top of Prince of Wales road, has been built in the Italian style of red stone and brick, and has in front a pediment with the arms of the city cut in red stone: the entrance is under a glazed light iron room, supported on columns: the basement of the building contains kitchen, dining room, &c.; on the ground floor to the left are the buffet and ladies' room, and on the right the board room, secretary's and other offices: the main hall gives 120 feet of length and 98 feet width, with pens of wrought iron, all movable: the floor is paved with wood blocks on concrete and blue Staffordshire tiles: on three sides of the hall are galleries supported by strong iron columns with rolled iron girders and joists: an ornamental cast iron railing runs round, and cranes are provided on the east and well sides for raising exhibits: the entrance for stock is at the south end and west side, and there are side doors in the main front for approaching the music and assembly rooms above: the semi-roof over the main hall is constructed of wrought-iron, the girders, supports, and spandrils being fill with ornamental scroll-work , surmounted by a skylight the length of the hall: ventilation is established by louvre boardings on either side: this part of the hall is lighted by three grand coronæ, and the galleries by star pendant burners: the staircases from the main hall to the galleries are of pitch-pine, with turned ornamental balusters, newels, and massive-moulded hand-rails: over the main entrance and offices is the music, or concert or assembly room, which is approached from the left of the front entrance by a stone staircase, and runs the whole length of the front, while it is 48 feet 3in. in width: a stage has been erected: there are seats for an audience of some 800. The room is lighted by nine windows in front and by small lunette lights above, and by six brass gaseliers: the roof over the main hall has been executed by Messrs. John Butler & Sons, of Stanningley, near Leeds: the bricks were supplied by Mr. Charles Cunnell, of Catton, and the ornamental and moulded bricks by Mr. Gunton from his works at Cossey; the stone carving was the work of Mr. Allen of Cathedral street: the slates for the roof by Ashton and Green: the building is heated by hot water, in pipes and coils which are concealed by ornamental cast-iron, with marble tops: the cooking apparatus is capable of providing for 100 or 200 persons, and with the ironwork generally throughout the building is the work of Messrs. Barnard, Bishop and Barnards of Norwich Ironworks. Messrs. Lacey were the contractors for the erection of the building, and J. B. Pearce esq. the architect.

The General Post Office at the top of Prince of Wales' road is a handsome building with portico, built by the late Sir Robert Harvey for a bank.

Chapel Field has been converted into beautiful gardens by the Corporation, in the centre of which is an elaborate iron pavilion, designed by the late Thomas Jeckyll esq. and manufactured by Messrs Barnard, Bishop and Barnards, which was exhibited at the Paris and Philadelphia Exhibitions. The Police Band performs here every Thursday evening during the season.

The Market place is about 600 feet long and 340 feet wide, and contains butchers' stalls, and a fish, butter and vegetable market. A statue of the Duke of Wellington is in the centre of the Market place. There is a seed and skin market. The markets are held every Wednesday and Saturday, the latter being for corn and cattle: it is held in an open space called the Castle meadow, opposite the Castle, and is usually thronged with cattle. A large fair for horses and cattle, called the Tombland Fair, is held on the day before good Friday and pleasure fairs are held at Easter and Whitsuntide.

Bethel Hospital is in Bethel street, erected in 1718 by Mrs. Chapman, agreeable to the request of her deceased husband, the Rev. J. Chapman, rector of Thorpe, near Norwich, for the habitation of poor lunatics, and not for natural born idiots: for its endowment she left by will, all her personal estates to seven trustees, giving them the sole management of the asylum, for as any poor lunatics as the revenue will afford: the building has been enlarged at different periods, and will now hold 80 patients; the income is about £2,000 yearly.

Heigham Hall, situated at Upper Heigham, is a private lunatic asylum, with extensive grounds; John Ferae Watts is the proprietor.

The Norfolk County Lunatic Asylum is at Thorpe, under which place a description will be found.

The Norfolk and Norwich Hospital was founded in 1770, it was rebuilt in 1882: the first stone having been laid by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, 17th June, 1872: the new hospital has been constructed partly on the old site and partly on the piece of land known as the flint House; the building is on the Pavilion system, the plan in the form of H, the administrative block being in the centre, facing St. Stephen's road, and containing an entrance hall, library and consulting room, surgery, dispensary, board-room and secretary's office, waiting and porter's room; the out-patients' department is now entirely distinct from the working portion of the hospital, and has been formed in the old north-east wing, which has been further adapted for the purposes of the anatomical museum and nurses' dormitories: in the rear of the building is a Gothic chapel. The new building was opened by their R.H.H. the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, on Monday, August 20th, 1883.

The corporation of Norwich have built a Lunatic asylum for the city, at Hellesdon, distant about two miles, to supersede the one formerly used in Infirmary road: the new building was erected to hold 350 patients and the administrative portion is large enough to work an asylum for 500 or 600 inmates: the plan is on what is known as the "block system" -- detached buildings connected together by communicating corridors and surrounded by airing courts -- and there is one peculiar feature in the arrangements which has never been carried out in any other lunatic asylum: i.e. the upper floors are entirely empty during the day, and the ground floor during the night, thus giving perfect ventilation to each story every twelve hours: the cost of the works has exceeded £60,000, including the purchase of the site and furniture: the architect is Mr. Makilwaine Phipson F.S.A.: there are about 50 acres of land attached to the asylum, the cultivation of which is entrusted to the patients, under direction, with very satisfactory results: the building is lighted by gas supplied from the Norwich gas works: the water is pumped up by steam from a well 100 feet deep on the premises: there are about 100 single room, and the other 250 inmates are associated together in dormitories containing from 4 to 16 patients each: in 1851 a mortuary and stables were built near the entrance lodge, also two semi-detached cottages for the artizans: the asylum was opened and organised by the first and present superintendent, Dr. William Harris F.R.C.S.

St. Giles', or the Great Hospital, Bishopsgate street, St. Helen's, is of ancient foundation and contains 98 aged men and 88 women, who are boarded and lodged; the income is about £7,000 a year.

Doughty's Hospital accommodates 24 poor men and 19 women, and was thoroughly restored and some new buildings added in 1869.

The Norwich Public Subscription Library is on Guildhall hill, and contains 50,000 volumes, and a Law Library, with 4,000 volumes.

The Dean and Chapter Library is in the Close, and consists of 3,200 volumes for use of the clergy.

The Norwich Free library at the corner of St. Andrew's and Duke streets is a large and handsome building, erected and opened in 1857 at an outlay of £10,000: it includes large rooms for the Museum and literary Institution: a Lending Library on the ground floor, of 7,000 volumes, open every day except Sundays and Thursdays, from 11 a.m. till 3 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.; a spacious reading room on the first floor (measuring 45 ft. by 31) contains the books known as the City Library, 1,800 volumes, and a reference library of 1,100 volumes, also a good supply of London and provincial newspapers, reviews, magazines, periodicals and directories: this room is open every day except sundays from 10 a.m. till 9.30 p.m. The School of Art is situated at the top of the building, where classes are held in connection with South Kensington, as also the instruments of the Norwich Meteorological Society.

The Norfolk and Norwich Literary Institution was established in 1822 and contains a valuable collection of upwards of 27,000 volumes; the annual subscription to subscribers without shares is £2 2s. and to shareholders £1 11s. 6d.; the original price of the shares was £5 5s.: a complete alphabetical catalogue of the entire collection was issued early in 1870 and an appendix, with recent additions, is published annually; the number of subscribers is 300.

The Norwich Medico-Chirurgical Society has a library of about 5,000 volumes of medical and surgical works.

The Norwich Museum was founded in 1824 as a scientific collection only; but in 1845 and subsequent years, it was gradually thrown open to the public: it contains collections of curiosities from foreign countries, a very fine ornithological collection, of which the raptorial, or birds of prey, is considered to be one of the finest in Europe: there are numerous specimens of birds frequenting the broads or meres of the county: there are various anatomical specimens of extinct animals, a very fine collection of fossils, the products of the county, many of which have been dredged from the German Ocean by the Norfolk fishermen; these include many bones and teeth of the elephant, mastodon &c.

The Theatre is large and convenient. Noverre's Assembly Room, 70 feet by 35, is hired occasionally for concerts, for which it is well adapted, having been built on acoustic principles, well-ventilated and opens on a well-kept lawn, with conservatory and ante-rooms, with spacious entrances and separate ways of egress. Norwich is a good school of music and has several local societies for its cultivation. There are horticultural exhibitions. Norwich has produced several eminent painters, particularly Old Crome.

Norwich is within the Eastern military district, the head quarters of which is at Colchester.

The Cavalry Barracks, at Pockthorpe, occupy the site of the old manor house: they are handsome red brick buildings, surrounded by a high wall, enclosing an area of 10 acres, constructed for 440 men of all ranks, and about 300 horses. There are also barracks for the West Norfolk Militia, which forms the 3rd Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment, the depôt of which is Yarmouth.

There are four banks and a savings bank. Messrs. Gurneys, Birkbecks, Barclay and Buxton, in Bank plain; the national Provincial Bank of England in London street; the London and Provincial Bank Limited, in the Old Haymarket, and Lacon (Sir Edmund K. bart.), Lacons, Youell and Co. Market place. The Savings bank is at the corner of the Old Haymarket.

A Chamber of Agriculture was established in 1868.

The most flourishing period in the recent history of Norwich manufactures occurred during the middle of the last century, when fabrics of almost every kind were made, and next to Manchester, London and Glasgow, it was one of the largest seats of the weaving trade, which has derived fresh vigour from the introduction of the factory system. The chief productions of bombazines, crapes, gauzes, challis, mousselin-de-laine, fillover shawls, silk shawls, bandannas, camlets, mohair, paramattas, poplins, baréges, glove cloths, sewing cotton, coach lace, horsehair, sacking and sailcloth. There are several large foundries; agricultural implements, steam boilers, galvanised wire netting, iron fencing and iron gates are extensively made here, and the proximity of the city to the rivers Wensum and Yare gives great facility for transit. There are also dyehouses, foundries, machine works, tanneries, five large breweries, maltkilns, coach works, rope works, chemical works, soaperies, paper mills, artificial manure works, extensive brick, tile and drain pipe works; the boot and shoe trade employs some thousands of hands and now has become on of the staple trades of the city, The goods are chiefly exported by the rivers to Yarmouth and Lowestoft, and the rail affords the facility for the rapid transit of goods to the metropolis.

Here are extensive premises of Messrs. J. and J. Colman, who employ nearly two thousand hands in the manufacture of mustard, starch, blue and corn flour; the Carrow works are situated just outside the King Street Gates, on the banks of the river Wensum. A short distance from the gates a school has been erected for the children of the workpeople in their employ.

The Norwich Vinegar Works and distillery of Messrs. Hills and Underwood, situated in the Prince of Wales's road and close to Thorpe station, are by far the largest of the kind in East Anglia, and were established in 1762, when a small manufactory for vinegar was erected on a part of the site now occupied by the present extensive range of buildings: the business has gradually increased until it has reached its present proportions: it includes the distillation and rectifying of gin, a branch scarcely less important than the manufacture of vinegar. British cordials and liqueurs are also manufactured here: the demand for these articles in foreign countries and the colonies is rapidly increasing, and thousands of casks of vinegar and gin are annually exported by this firm: the purity of the vinegar manufactured here is undoubted; at the Great Exhibition of 1851 Messrs. Hills and Underwood received the only prize medal awarded for vinegar, and within the last few years they have introduced several modern and important improvements in their works, which have elicited testimonials from the most eminent chemists of the day: the size and number of the vats remind visitors of those seen in the great breweries of the metropolis: it is only by thus becoming acquainted with the details of the manufacture of this article that we are able to realise what we before vaguely comprehended, the vast importance of the manufacture of an article in such common use as vinegar: the vinegar brewery and distillery form a handsome block of buildings, the whole, including yards and store-houses, covering an area of several acres: the proprietors also carry on an extensive trade in wine and all kinds of spirits; their house in London, the centre from which their large trade in the western, midland and southern counties is carried on, comprises extensive vaults, stored with thousands of dozens of choice wines, and large stocks are also kept in the bonded warehouses in London, Norwich and Yarmouth.

At St. Miles' Bride are the extensive iron works of Messrs. Barnard, Bishop and Barnards, whose artistic productions in iron and brass have a wide reputation: they are manufacturers of the Slow Combustion or Norwich Stove, known as the Country Parson's Fire Grate, also manufacturers of galvanized wire netting, horticultural and garden requisites &c. &c.

Messrs. Boulton and Paul, of Rose Lane Works, are also extensive manufacturers of wire netting and horticultural buildings, and every requisite for the garden.

The British Gas Light Company have extensive works at Bishop's Bridge and St. Martin's at Palace.

The Waterworks Company serve the city with a continuous supply of good water obtained from the river.

The railway communication is chiefly by the Great Eastern Company, who have three stations, at Thorpe, Victoria and Trowse; the latter is a large and important cattle station; on the departure side of the line are 18 lairs and 19 loading pens, capable of storing 2,000 head of beasts and 4,000 sheep: on the down side are 9 lairs and 13 pens, which will store 1,500 beasts and 3,000 sheep: the lairs and pens combined cover an area of nearly 7 acres: a new bridge over the line has recently (1883) been built at Trowse at a cost of £15,000.

The new Eastern and midlands Railway Company have also a station here, called the City station.

Earlham is a parish and village 2½ miles west from Norwich station, situated on the river Yare, over which is an old stone bridge of one arch, within the county of the city of Norwich. The church of St. Mary is a flint stone building, in the Early English style, has chancel, nave and north transept, a square embattled tower, and the whole edifice is enveloped in ivy: the chancel is divided from the nave by a richly-carved oak screen: there is a handsome stained memorial window to John Gurney esq.; a leaden roof was constructed in 1745, and the interior repaired in 1834: near the communion table is a fine ancient monument to the Bacon family richly sculptured in marble; it was many years in St. Giles' church, London, but was obtained by the brother, Waller Bacon esq. and transferred to its present site near the family vault. The register dates from the year 1621. The living is a vicarage consolidated with Bowthorpe, yearly value £120, in the gift of F. Bacon Frank esq. and held since 1849 by the Rev. John Harvey Pain B.A. of Caius College, Cambridge. The Hall, which stands a little south-east of the church, is an old and picturesque mansion: it is in the midst of a park, ornamented with trees and plantations and is the property of F. Bacon Frank esq. who is lord of the manor, and the trustees of the late John Gurney esq. The area is 1,255A. 1R. 34P.: rateable value £1,555; and the population in 1881 was 238.

Eaton is a parish and suburb of Norwich extending 2 miles south-west, bounded by the Yare, containing a large number of handsome villa residences, occupied by the merchants and traders of the city, within the county of the city of Norwich. The church of St. Andrew is an ancient flint building, in the Early English style, consisting of chancel and nave, covered with thatch, having a tower and 3 bells: the parents of Henry Kirke White, the poet, were interred in this church: the sacramental cup is of date 1684, and there are a sedilia and a piscina. The register dates from the year 1568. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £300 and house and 43 acres of glebe, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Norwich and held since 2875 by the Rev. Wm. Melville Pigot M.A. of Brasenose College, Oxford. A district church named Christ Church was built by subscription, and was opened on the 4th of November 1873: it is a handsome cruciform building of flint with brick and Bath stone facings, in the French Gothic style: it consists of nave and transept, and has a stained glass east window, and a pretty spire containing 1 bell. There are several nurseries here: that of Messrs. Ewing and Co. covers an area of 40 acres, which are open to the public free on week days. The Norfolk and Norwich Cricket Club have their ground here. The Dean and Chapter of Norwich, who are lords of the manor, and the trustees of the late Richard Hanbury Gurney esq. are the principal landowners. The soil is light and sandy; subsoil, sand and gravel. The crops are of the usual kind. The area is included in Norwich; gross estimated rental, £8019 4s.; rateable value, £7,055; and the population in 1881 was 1,237.

Parish Clerk, Charles Chamberlain.

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POST OFFICE.-- William Webb, receiver. Letters are received by foot post from Norwich at 8 a.m. The nearest money order office is at Norwich

INSURANCE AGENT.-- Norwich Union Fire, J. G. Burton

National School (mixed), supported by voluntary contributions, with Government grant & small weekly fee from scholars: Frederick Holloway, master; Mrs. Elizabeth Holloway, mistress.

Heigham is a parish and hamlet within the county of the city of Norwich, forming a populous suburb on the north, situate on the river Wensum. The church of St. Bartholomew, standing on an eminence 1 mile north from Norwich Market place, is an ancient flint building, in the Perpendicular style: it has chancel, nave, south aisle, square tower and 3 bells; in 1878 the nave, aisle and tower were restored, the old porch and vestry removed and a north aisle with organ-chamber and vestry erected: the enlargement and restoration was done in memory of Bishop Hall. There are 900 sittings. The register dates from the year 1570. The living is a rectory, yearly value £300, in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich and held since 1875 by the Rev. Frederick Taylor. Heigham is celebrated as the retreat (at the time of the Rebellion) of the much persecuted Bishop Hall, who lies buried in the chancel of St. Bartholomew's church. The Dolphin Inn, which was his residence, is an interesting relic of ancient times, and has much in it to attract the notice of the antiquarian and archæologist, as well as the lover of the picturesque.

Lakenham is a parish within the county of the city of Norwich, extending 1½ miles south, situated on the Yare. Here are two churches. The parish church of St. John and All Saints, situated 1 mile south from the Market place, Norwich, stands on a hill north of the river Yare: it is an ancient building of flint, in the Perpendicular style, and consists of chancel, nave and tower with 3 bells: there is a piscina. The register dates from the year 1568. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £361, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1860 by the Rev. Alfred Pownall M.A. of St. Catherine's College, Cambridge. Edward William Trafford esq. is lord of the manor and the chief landowner. The soil is gravel; subsoil, various. The chief crops are wheat and barley. The area is given within Norwich; rateable value about £15,000; the population in 1881 was 6,378.

Parish Clerk, John Calton.

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POST OFFICE;-- William Chettleborough, receiver. Letters received from Norwich, the nearest money order & telegraph office; arrive at 5.15 a.m.; dispatched at 6 p.m.

New Lakenham, south of Norwich, is an ecclesiastical parish, formed in 1845 out of Lakenham parish. St. Mark's church is a handsome flint building, in the Perpendicular style: it has chancel, nave, and an embattled tower with pinnacles and 3 bells: it contains a wooden lectern, a copy of one in Shipdham church: the chancel windows are stained: there are 900 sittings, most of which are free. The register dates from 1844. The living is a vicarage, yearly value £150, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter and held since 1873 by the Rev. John William Colvin M.A. of Corpus Christi college, Oxford.

Thorpe Hamlet is a suburb on the east of Norwich, and was constituted a separate ecclesiastical parish in 1852 The church of St. Matthew was erected in the year 1851, and is built upon land, the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Norwich: it is well placed on the slope of a hill close by the river Wensum, and is a solid structure, built of Kentish rag stone, in the Norman style: the interior is plain and simple: in the apse are stained windows, representing the Four Evangelists and the Call of St. Matthew; in the north transept are two stained windows representing the Parable of the Good Samaritan and of the Vineyard Labourers: the church is seated with open benches, and has sittings for 600, of which 337 are free. The living is a vicarage in the gift of the rector of Thorpe St. Andrew, and is held since 1874 by the Rev. Richard Deare Pierpoint M.A. of St. John's College, Cambridge; the commutation of rent charge, in lieu of tithe throughout the district, belongs to the vicar: there is no endowment, with the exception of £1,011 7s. 7d. £3 per Cent. Consuls, standing in the name of the Governors of Queen Anne's Bounty, and producing the yearly sum of £30 6s. 8d. which is appropriated in perpetuity towards the support of the minister: in addition to this the minister is entitled, by deed of endowment, to all the new-rents derived from 263 sittings in the church, after the deduction of £5 10s. yearly towards the repairs and expenses incident to the performance of divine service: also £95 yearly from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The schools and vicarage house are both built on land abutting upon the church, the gift of the Dean and Chapter: there are three excellent schools for boys, girls and infants, under Government inspection: the school-rooms are commodious and well ventilated, and will hold from 400 to 500 children; they were built of flint, and were erected in the year 1853. The vicarage house is a good substantial structure, built, like the schools, of flint: it was erected in the year 1863.

The area of the city of Norwich is 4,772 acres; rateable value, £267,750; and the population in 1871 was 80,386; and in 1881 was 87,842, as follows:--

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© Transcribed by E.C.Apling, May 2001. Links updated December, 2013.

List of 1891 Census Names Indexes for parishes in Norwich City
Agreement between James BARBER of Aylsham and Charles CLAY of Norwich [Linda Steward]
Jenny Lind (founder of Children's Hospital) [Eastern Daily Press]
Norwich Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Norwich Catholic Cathedral [Simon Knott]
Holy Apostles Jesuit Chapel [Simon Knott]
Ancient church of St. Clement, Conesford [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Francis, Heartseae [Simon Knott]
{Modern] church of St. Mary Magdalene [Simon Knott]
Norwich City [Methodist] Church [Simon Knott]
Bowthorpe Road Methodist Church [Simon Knott] Church of St. Alban, Lakenham
Church of St. Barnabas, Heigham [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Bartholomew, Heigham [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Catherine [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Helen [Simon Knott]
Church of St. Thomas [Simon Knott]
Friends' Meeting House, Gildencroft [Simon Knott]
Hillcrest Chapel [Simon Knott]
Holy Trinity Church [Simon Knott]
Oak Grove Chapel [Simon Knott]
Potter's House Church (Dereham Road Baptist Church) [Simon Knott]
Our Lady Mother of God Catholic chapel [Simon Knott]
Roseberry Road Methodist Church [Simon Knott]
Seventh-Day Adventist Church [Simon Knott]
Silver Street Baptist Church [Simon Knott]
Sprowston Methodist Church [Simon Knott]
St. Lukes Church Centre [Simon Knott]
St. Peter Park Lane Methodist [Simon Knott]
Swedenborgian Chapel [Simon Knott]
Trinity URC church [Simon Knott]
Witard Road Baptist Church [Simon Knott]
Heigham tower mill [Jonathan Neville]
New Mills [Jonathan Neville]
More information on Norwich [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
More on Norwich [GENUKI-NFK]
Kelly's 1912 for Thorpe Hamlet GENUKI-NFK]
More on Thorpe Hamlet [GENUKI-NFK]
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