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Norfolk - Sandringham

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 484-485.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

SANDRINGHAM is a village and parish 7 miles north-by-east from Lynn and 1¾ miles east from Wolferton station, on the Lynn and Hunstanton railway, in the Western division of the county, Freebridge Lynn hundred and union, Lynn county court district, rural deanery of Lynn and archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich: the name is derived from its deep sandy soil, of which more than 200 acres are on the extensive heath stretching hence to Wolferton. The church of St. Mary Magdalene, standing in the grounds of Sandringham House, is a small but beautiful building, restored in 1857 by Lady Harriet Cowper: it is in the Perpendicular style, and consists of chancel, nave and porch, and has a tower at the west end containing 1 bell: the windows are filled with richly stained Munich glass: there is a handsome brass lectern eagle, chosen and presented by H.R.H. the Princess of Wales, in commemoration of the recovery of her husband: the font is handsome: at the east end of the church rest the remains of the infant Prince John Charles Alexander, to whose memory there is a small and very pretty white marble tomb and cross, bearing the inscription "Suffer Little Children to come unto Me and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven:" the east end was decorated by the Prince of Wales in 1878 with new credence table, three chancel windows, in memory of the infant prince, and of Colonel Grey, late equerry; also memorial bass to late rector on south wall of chancel, by friends: there is an organ with two rows of keys and pedals, the gift of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. The register dates from the year 1557. The living is a rectory, with Babingley and West Newton annexed, joint yearly value £210 with residence, in the gift of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, and held by the Rev. Frederick Alfred John Hervey M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge, who also holds the post of Domestic Chaplain to the Prince of Wales, and is also Hon. Chaplain to Her Majesty the Queen. Bricks are made in the parish, and carr stone is obtained, both of which have been used in the construction of cottages on the estate. The parishes of Sandringham, Wolferton, Babingley, West Newton, and parts of Appleton and Dersingham, containing between 7,000 and 8,000 acres, were purchased by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales from C. S. Cowper for about £220,000. Sandringham House, the seat of Field Marshal H.R.H. the Prince of Wales K.G. was erected in 1870, the old house being entirely cleared away: the style of the new building is Elizabethan, the walls being of brick, with Ketton stone dressings and finishings: the floors are fire-proof construction throughout, formed with rolled iron joists and concrete: the main part of the building, with the offices, forms a parallelogram of about 450 ft. by 70 ft.: in the west front are placed the drawing and dining rooms, with libraries adjoining: on the east side is the principal entrance, with a stone portico, forming covered carriage entrance: the architect was A. J. Humbert esq. of London, and the builders Messrs. J. and M. Goggs, of Swaffham: the flower gardens and pleasure grounds, though not very extensive, are tastefully laid out, and interspersed with evergreens and venerable oaks: there are also some pieces of water; the kitchen garden is 15 acres in extent, seven acres of which are within the walls, and form a parallelogram with an oval at each end, with a convenient carriage drive around: the stables are spacious, to hold about forty horses: the park is stocked with deer, and the estate abounds with game, including blackcock. Sandringham Water Works were erected in 1878, to supply Sandringham House with pure water; the supply is from a chalk spring in Den Beck Wood, the yield of which varies from 15,000 to 150,000 gallons in the 24 hours, and the level of which is 92 ft. above Ordnance datum: the water is conveyed through stoneware pipes to the pumping station, where it is softened by Clarke's process to about 6 degrees: the tank on the tower is octagonal and of cast iron, capable of containing 32,000 gallons: this tank is upwards of 60 ft. from the ground: thence the water is driven to the Hall through 6-inch pipes; and to the stables and gardens through 3-inch pipes. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales is lord of the manor and sole landowner. The soil is heath, peat and sand, with clay in parts, with a subsoil of the same; the farm (east end of parish), light soil, with subsoil of chalk. The crops, wheat, barley, turnips and seeds, in the four-course system. The area is 1,172 acres; rateable value, £1,223; the population in 1881 was 81.

Letters through Lynn, viâ Dersingham. The latter is the nearest money order & telegraph office. There is a PILLAR LETTER BOX opposite the Norwich gates, cleared at 6 p.m.

There is a POST, MONEY ORDER & TELEGRAPH OFFICE at the Hall, for the exclusive use of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales & the household. William Mann, receiver. Letters arrive through Lynn at 6.30 a.m. & are dispatched at 6.15 p.m.

A school-room with residence for the mistress, was built in 1867 by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales: it is attended by about 30 children & is now in connection with West Newton school

© Transcribed by E.C.Apling, February 2005; spelling correction and links last updated April 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845 and 1864 [GENUKI-NFK]
Archeology of Sandringham [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Sandringham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
Local web-site
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page