1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845; 1864 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
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Norfolk - Sedgeford

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.488.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C. ("Paddy") Apling]

SEDGEFORD is a parish and village, with a station three quarters of a mile north from the village, on the West Norfolk junction railway 13 miles north-north-east from Lynn and 10 south-west from Burnham Market, in the Western division of the county, Smithdon hundred, Docking union, Lynn county court district, Heacham rural deanery, Norfolk archdeaconry and Norwich diocese, situated in the vale of a small rivulet.. The church of St. Mary is an ancient Gothic building of stone and flint, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, two porches and a transept, and has a round tower with octagon top, containing 3 bells: the chancel is paved with Minton's tiles: there is a stained window in the tower representing Martha and Mary, with a bras plate underneath, with the following inscription:— "To the glory of God and the memory of Martha Holt, wife of C. P. Neville-Rolfe esq. of Heacham Hall, this window is dedicated by some of the parishioners of Sedgeford A.D. 1864; she was born March 23rd, 1818, and died at Naples, January 22nd, 1863:" there is also a fine window, representing "The Transfiguration," in the transept, and another on the south of the chancel, to the memory of C. P. Neville-Rolfe esq.: the church was repaired and re-seated about the year 1842, and was restored in 1882 at a cost of about £2,200: there is an organ: the font is square, raised and supported on four short pedestals. The register dates from the year 1560. The living is a vicarage, united with the sinecure rectory of Southmere, or Summerfield, gross rent-charge £650, with good residence in the Tudor style, and nine acres of glebe, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Norwich alternately with the Provost and fellows of Eton College and held, the vicarage since 1857 and the rectory since 1874, by the Rev, James Ambrose Ogle M.A. of Brasenose College, Oxford, who is rural dean of Heacham, Here are Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist chapels. Here are a corn mill, sand pit and chalk quarry. Rolfe's charity of £16 is for clothing, and £20 yearly, the rent of the fuel allotment of nine acres is applied in coals. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners, who are lords of the manor, Eustace Neville-Rolfe esq J.P. Hamon le Strange esq. J.P. E. Green and J. Davy esqrs. are chief landowners. The soil is of a chalky nature; subsoil principally chalk. The chief crops are wheat, barley, turnips, mangolds and grass. The area is 4,180 acres; rateable value, £5,088; the population in 1881 was 779.

There is a hamlet, anciently called Gnatyngdon, or Netlington, now called EATON, and consisting of three farms 1 mile north-west.


POST OFFICE.—Mrs. Eliza Skerry, sub-postmistress, London & other letters are received through Lynn, viâ Snettisham, arrive at 7 a.m.; box closes at 5.30 p.m. sundays included. Heacham & Snettisham are the nearest money order offices & telegraph office is at Snettisham.

A Church of England school is conducted on the National plan, supported by voluntary contributions, aided by Government grant; John Cary Saunders, master

Railway Station, England Baynes, station master

CARRIER.—John Mott, to the Green Dragon, Lynn, every tuesday

© Transcribed by E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, October 2006; links updated February 2011.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1845; 1864 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Sedgeford postmill and towermill [Jonathan Nveille]
Sedgeford archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Sedgeford [GENUKI-NFK]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page