1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
White's 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
South Creake Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Arthur Mee's "The King's England" [John Powditch]
South Creake Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
South Creake early postmill, Beck Street postmill, South Creake Common postmill and Compton Hall postmill [Jonathan Neville]
St. Mary's Church, South Creake by Frank Ives and Colin Cunliffe
More on South Creake [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information[Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
and see North Creake
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page

Norfolk - South Creake

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p. 270.

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © E.C."Paddy" Apling]

SOUTH CREAKE is a parish and village 4 miles south from Burnham Market railway station, 7 miles south-west from Wells and 21 from Lynn, in the Western division of the county, Brothercross hundred, Docking union, Little Walsingham county court district, Burnham rural deanery, Norfolk archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich; it is situated on the Fakenham road and on a small rivulet which rises here and falls into the sea at Burnham Overy Staith. The church of St. Mary the Virgin, situated on a slight eminence, is a large and ancient structure of flint with stone dressings, in the Perpendicular style, and consists of chancel, nave with clerestory, aisles, vestry, south porch and square western tower containing 5 bells: a few of the windows in the aisles, also of the clerestory, are partially filled with ancient stained glass: the seats are open benches: there is an oak rood screen, and a large and massive iron-bound chest, having five fastenings, and lined with cedar : the font is octagonal, the sculpture of which is good, but much disfigured. The register dates from the year 1538, and is in a good state of preservation. The living is a discharged vicarage, gross yearly value £440 5s. with residence, in the gift of the Marquis Townshend and held since 1877 by the Rev. Isaac Bowman M.A. Trinity College, Cambridge. The Congregational Chapel is a plain brick building, with a small burial-ground and residence for the minister adjoining. Isaac Lane, in 1675, left £100 for the purchase of land, the rent to be expended in the distribution of coals during the winter and 16 penny loaves every Lord's day; the present value of £40 yearly; the Sunday dole of bread is still continued; £15 a year is paid to the National school and the remainder in coals and other necessaries for such of the poor of the parish as are 60 years of age, and widows. Mrs. Elizabeth Pell, daughter of the aforesaid, left £100 for the purchase of land, the rent of which was to be expended in like manner: this land now lets for £15 a year. Mrs. Dorothy Woodhouse, by will, dated 1640, left 20s. to the minister in consideration of his preaching two sermons a year, and 30s. to the poor of the parish, the half to be paid the same days the sermons are preached; the present yearly value of this gift is about 20 guineas per annum; the 50s. is still paid for the two sermons and the dole of bread, the remainder is given to the National school fund. The town charity of 12 acres, lets for £12 a year, which is given to the National school. There is also a fuel allotment of 23 acres of land, the rent of which, £30 yearly, is expended in coals and distributed to the poor at Christmas. Present annual value of charities £126. About half a mile south-west from the church is a remarkable Saxon fortification, the road to which is called Bloodgate, from the tradition that a great slaughter took place here in a battle between the Saxons and Danes. The Marquis of Townshend is lord of the manor and impropriator. The principal landowners are the Marquis of Townshend, the Earl of Leicester and D. T. Belding esq. The soil is mixed, productive and well cultivated; subsoil, chalk and gravel. The chief crops are wheat, barley, turnips, mangold-wurtzel and seeds. The area is 4,075 acres; rateable value £5,944; the population in 1881 was 976.
Parish Clerk, Franklin Young

___________

POST & MONEY ORDER OFFICE & Savings Bank.-- Thomas Heyhoe Oliver, postmaster. Letters received through Fakenham at 8 a.m. and dispatched at 4.45 p.m. weekdays only. The telegraph office is at Burnham Market
National School (boys & girls), to hold 330 children; average attendance 165; Alban Harris, master.
CARRIER.-- Webster, from North Creake to Fakenham passes through daily, wednesdays excepted

© Transcribed by E.C.Apling, September 2004; links updated November 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
White's 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
South Creake Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Arthur Mee's "The King's England" [John Powditch]
South Creake Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
South Creake early postmill, Beck Street postmill, South Creake Common postmill and Compton Hall postmill [Jonathan Neville]
St. Mary's Church, South Creake by Frank Ives and Colin Cunliffe
More on South Creake [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information[Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
and see North Creake
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page