1891 Census Names Index
Brothercross hundred
Docking union
Kelly's 1883
White's 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
South Creake Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Arthur Mee's "The King's England" [John Powditch]
South Creake early postmill, Beck Street postmill, South Creake Common postmill and Compton Hall postmill [Jonathan Neville]
St. Mary's Church, South Creake by Frank Ives and Colin Cunliffe
More on South Creake [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information[Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
and see North Creake
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Norfolk - South Creake

Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, pp. 621-622

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, September 2004]

SOUTH CREAKE is a parish and village of dispersed houses, pleasantly situated on the Fakenham road, 4 miles south of Burnham Market, containing 1,041 inhabitants, 223 houses, and 4,029a. 1r. 1p. of land, exclusive of four distinct sheep walks of about 700 acres. Capt. J. Townshend, R. N., M.P. for Tamworth, (who succeeded the late Lord Charles Vere Ferrars Townshend,) owns a great part of the soil, and is lord of the manor, impropriator of the great tithes, and patron of the vicarage. The Earl of Leicester owns the Leicester Square farm, 700 acres, and there are several smaller proprietors. The Church, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, has a lofty nave, side aisles, chancel, and a low tower with five bells. The living is a discharged vicarage, which was certified at £35, but has now a yearly rent of £440, awarded in lieu of tithes. The Rev. Hy. Goggs, M.A., is the incumbent. About half a mile south-west of the church is a remarkable Saxon fortification, the road to which is still called Blood-gate, from the tradition that a great slaughter was here made in a battle between the Saxons and Danes. The Independents have a chapel here. Dorothy Woodhouse, in 1640, charged certain lands with the payment of 20s. a year, to the minister, and 30s. to the poor. In consequence of the non-payment of these rent-charges, the trustees obtained possession of the land in 1692, and it is now let for £8 10s. per annum, of which £2 2s. is paid for two sermons, and the remainder distributed among the poor. Two legacies of £100 left by Isaac Lane, in 1669, and Elizabeth Pell, in 1730, were laid out in the purchase of 14 acres of land in this parish, and 8a. in Terrington St. John's, and the yearly income, about £23 a year, is expended in bread and coals, for the poor, who have also 40s. a year left by John Ward, in 1715. An old building called the Town House, is also occupied by poor widows. The old Poor's Land, 10a. 0r. 20p. given by unknown donors, is held by the schoolmaster, who is also partly remunerated for the education of poor children from the above charity funds.

Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, September 2004; links updated November, 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
Brothercross hundred
Docking union
Kelly's 1883
White's 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
South Creake Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Arthur Mee's "The King's England" [John Powditch]
South Creake early postmill, Beck Street postmill, South Creake Common postmill and Compton Hall postmill [Jonathan Neville]
St. Mary's Church, South Creake by Frank Ives and Colin Cunliffe
More on South Creake [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information[Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]
and see North Creake
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page