1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
White's 1845, 1864 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Weeting with Broomhill Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Inns in Weeting [Norfolk Pubs Index]
Weeting local web-site
Grimes Graves [English Heritage]
More on Weeting [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Andrew Rivett & Geoff Lowe]
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Norfolk - Weeting-with-Bromehill

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 548-9.

[Complete entry.] © Transcribed by E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, February 1999

WEETING-with-BROMEHILL form one parish, on the navigable river Little Ouse and the borders of Suffolk, in the Western division of the county, union and county court district of Thetford, hundred of Grimshoe, rural deanery of Cranwich, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The Brandon station and about 5 miles of the Great Eastern railway are within the parish of Weeting. There were two churches here at a former period, but one (All Saints) was demolished a century ago by the falling in of the tower, and some of the ruins are still to be seen in the park; also the ruins of a castle, built by "the Earl de Warenne," son-in-law of William the Norman; the De la Plaix family succeeded to the De Warennes. The remaining church of St. Mary is a small building in the Decorated style, consisting of chancel, nave, north aisle and round embattled tower containing 2 bells. The register dates from the year 1558. The livings form a consolidated rectory, joint tithe rent charge £517, with 150 acres of glebe and house, in the gift of Caius Collge, Cambridge, and held since 1857 by the Rev. Stephen Hanson M.A late fellow of that college, who resides at 61 Warwick-gardens, Kensington: the Rev. Charles Thomas Ward B.A. of Wadham College, Oxford, is curate in charge. The Devil's Dyke borders the parish for about 3 miles on the north-west, an ancient mound or parapet of earth extending from the Ouse to Didlington, supposed to have been cast up by some tribe of the ancient Britons to prevent predatory incursions of their neighbours. In the parish are Grimes graves, of which a scientific examination was made in 1870 by the Rev. Canon Greenwell, of Durham, the well known opener of the Yorkshire Wold tumuli: the main object of the examination is to test the soundness of the foregone conclusion of archeologists, that these works are the remains of an ancient British village, when the primitive people of the period lived in dwellings partly sunk into the ground: the "graves," of which there are more than a hundred, are circular in form, situate in a wild and desolate locality: large numbers of animal bones have been turned up, amongst them the horns of red and roe deer, the teeth of a small ox, goats, swine and dog, and other objects of interest, chief amongst which were several rolled pebbles, worn at the ends by use as flint flaking tools, clublike instruments, made from antler of the red deer and apparently the implements with which the larger flakes were struck off, a bone pin, ingeniously sharpened by the hand of man, and a piece of chalk, with a hole through it bored from each side; these several articles were found at depths varying from ten to thirty-five feet below the surface: sufficient has been done to satisfy Canon Greenwell that "Grimes graves" are not the remains of a British village, as has been supposed, but are ancient flint quarries, the pits having evidently been worked for some such purpose, no doubt in times pre-historic. In the flint quarries at Bromehill numerous flint implements of the earliest type, similar to the well known St. Acheul specimens, have been found, with the bones of extinct species of animals. The priory of Bromehill belonged to Cardinal Wolsey and was intended by him as an endowment for his college at Ipswich: it was one of the first suppressed, and afterwards given to Christ's College, Cambridge: it now belongs to W. Angerstein esq. who is lord of the manor and sole landowner. Weeting Hall, the seat of William Angerstein esq. D.L., J.P. is a handsome white brick building, in the Italian style, situated in an extensive park and surrounded by plantations. The soil is light and sandy; subsoil, chalk and sand. The chief crops are wheat, barley and turnips. The area is 6,187 acres; rateable value, £4,880; and the population in 1881 was 333.

_____

POST OFFICE.— Lydia Arnold, receiver. Letters arrive by mail cart from Brandon at 3 a.m.; delivery at 7 a.m. dispatched at 8.40 p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Brandon.

The school for this parish is supported by William Angerstein esq.; it will hold 80 children, average attendance 50; Alfred John Smith, master; Mrs. Martha Smith, mistress

© Transcribed by E.C. ("Paddy") Apling, February 1999; links updated November 2010.

1891 Census Names Index
White's 1854
White's 1845, 1864 and 1883 [GENUKI-NFK]
Weeting with Broomhill Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Inns in Weeting [Norfolk Pubs Index]
Weeting local web-site
Grimes Graves [English Heritage]
More on Weeting [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Andrew Rivett & Geoff Lowe]
Return to villages index
Paddy's home page