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Norfolk - Wereham

Francis White's History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk 1854, pp. 645-646

[Complete entry. Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, May 2000]

WEREHAM is a remarkably healthy village, standing on a gentle acclivity, 2 miles N.W. of Stoke Ferry, and 12 miles S. by E. of Lynn, containing several imposing mansions, among which are the Old and New Halls, and White House stand conspicuous. The parish comprises 145 houses, 609 inhabitants, and 2,231 acres of land, of which 900a. are arable, 1,000a. pasture, 20a. woods, 10 gardens, and 300a. fen. There are upwards of 40 land owners, the principal of whom are Sir Hy. Bedingfield, Bart., David Dickson, Esq., owner of the old Hall, (a fine old building erected several centuries ago by the Dethicks,) John Houchen, Esq. (at the New Hall, a handsome edifice on the Stoke road, which he built about 20 years ago,) and H. B. B. Mason, Esq. of the White House; the Rev. J. H. Sparke, the Trustees of A. Sewell, Esq., the Norwich Union Life Office, Sidney Sussex College, Mr. Robt. Carter, Mr. Robt. Oldhman [sic. Oldman], and Mr. Simeon Steward. The parish is partly freehold, and partly held of the manors of Wereham Hall and Snow Hall, (fine arbitrary,) and Cavenham, Stoke, Wereham, and Wretton, (fine certain.) The Trustees of A. Sewell, Esq. are lords of the two former, and J. S. Bradfield, of Stoke Ferry, of the latter. WINWALL PRIORY was founded by the Earls of Clare in the time of Richard I. or King John, for Benedictine monks: some remains of it may be seen near Winwall House, an ancient Norman structure, about a mile north of the village, and supposed to have been the prison of the Honour of Clare. The fair, formerly held on March 3rd, was removed to Downham some years ago. The CHURCH, dedicated to St. Margaret, has nave, south aisle, chancel, square tower, and one bell; it was new roofed in 1846, at a cost of £250, of which £100 was obtained by a rate, and the remainder by voluntary subscriptions. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to Wretton, valued in the King's book at £10 2s. 6d., and in 1831, at £109. It was augmented with £400, Queen Anne's bounty, in 1751, and with a yearly rent-charge of £18 given by Roger Pratt, Esq. The large tithes are commuted for £253 6s. 11d., and the small tithes for £290. E. R. Pratt, Esq., is patron, and the Rev. Jas. Royle, incumbent, who has a yearly modus of £32 from the impropriators, E. R. Pratt Esq., and Mrs. Eyres. The Wesleyans have a chapel here, and in the village is a large pool of clear water, supplied by a copious spring. The Fuel Allotment is about 20a. The poor have the dividends of £440 stock, purchased with £500 left by Sarah Adamson, in 1791; the dividends of £464 4s. 4d., three per cent consols, purchased with £300 left by Richd. Adamson, in 1801; the dividends of £100, purchased with £90 left by John Whaite, in 1826; and a yearly rent-charge of £5, secured by H. B. B. Mason, Esq., (in compliance with a request of his father, the late H. B. Mason, shortly before his demise) to be divided among the poor of 65 years old and upwards. Post Office at Jno. Tingey's: letters arrive at 8 a.m., and are despatched at 6 p.m.

Transcription Copyright © the late A.J. Carter, May 2000; White's printing error corrected November 2000; links updated May 2010.

Return to villages index
Paddy's home page
1891 Census Names Index
Clackclose hundred
Downham Union
Kelly's 1883
Wereham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
Wereham Archeology [Norfolk Heritage Explorer]
More on Wereham [GENUKI-NFK]
More Parish Information [Geoff Lowe & Andrew Rivett]